Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaires as Predictors of Unscheduled Health Care Visits in Adults With Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165448
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaires as Predictors of Unscheduled Health Care Visits in Adults With Cancer
Author(s):
Cooley, M.; Rimar, J.; Knafl, G.; McCorkle, R.
Author Details:
M. Cooley, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; J. Rimar; G. Knafl; R. McCorkle
Abstract:
Few studies have examined unscheduled health care visits (emergency room visits or inpatient hospitalizations) in adults with cancer. Unscheduled health care visits (USV) are important because they contribute toward increased costs and may indicate unmet needs. Studies have linked HR-QOL with survival in adults with cancer. Symptoms are also related to outcomes. Uncontrolled symptoms are related to a decrease in physical function and an increased utilization of health care services. As HR-QOL questionnaires move into the clinical setting, it is important to determine how useful these tools will be in predicting outcomes. It is not clear whether the single measurement of symptom distress or a multidimensional assessment is necessary to identify those at risk for poor clinical outcomes. Purpose: The purposes of this descriptive, correlational study were to describe the reasons for USV; identify cost of care associated with USV, examine the relationship between HR-QOL questionnaire scores at entry to the study and USV within the following four months; and identify factors associated with USV. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Donabedian Quality of Care Model was used as the framework for this study. Methods: Three reliable and valid HR-QOL questionnaires (Symptom Distress Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment, Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short Form) were tested in 79 outpatients with cancer. USV were measured using a hospital-based data system. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and logistic regression were used for analysis. Findings and Implications: Thirty percent of participants experienced USV. The most common reasons for these visits were myelosuppression, infection, and brain metastasis. Controlling for spatial autocorrelation in terms of elapsed days from study entry, the average actual variable direct cost of an USV was $3,261; hospitalizations averaged $4,175 whereas emergency room visits alone averaged $145. Although total scores of the HR-QOL questionnaires were not related to USV, single items from the SDS and the FACT were associated with USV. Other factors associated with USV were higher income, advanced stage of cancer, lymphoma, and combined cancer treatment. Results from this study suggest that USV are a significant problem and that use of a few items from the SDS and FACT may be useful in identifying those at high risk for USV.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth-Related Quality of Life Questionnaires as Predictors of Unscheduled Health Care Visits in Adults With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooley, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRimar, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCorkle, R.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Cooley, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; J. Rimar; G. Knafl; R. McCorkleen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165448-
dc.description.abstractFew studies have examined unscheduled health care visits (emergency room visits or inpatient hospitalizations) in adults with cancer. Unscheduled health care visits (USV) are important because they contribute toward increased costs and may indicate unmet needs. Studies have linked HR-QOL with survival in adults with cancer. Symptoms are also related to outcomes. Uncontrolled symptoms are related to a decrease in physical function and an increased utilization of health care services. As HR-QOL questionnaires move into the clinical setting, it is important to determine how useful these tools will be in predicting outcomes. It is not clear whether the single measurement of symptom distress or a multidimensional assessment is necessary to identify those at risk for poor clinical outcomes. Purpose: The purposes of this descriptive, correlational study were to describe the reasons for USV; identify cost of care associated with USV, examine the relationship between HR-QOL questionnaire scores at entry to the study and USV within the following four months; and identify factors associated with USV. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Donabedian Quality of Care Model was used as the framework for this study. Methods: Three reliable and valid HR-QOL questionnaires (Symptom Distress Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment, Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short Form) were tested in 79 outpatients with cancer. USV were measured using a hospital-based data system. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and logistic regression were used for analysis. Findings and Implications: Thirty percent of participants experienced USV. The most common reasons for these visits were myelosuppression, infection, and brain metastasis. Controlling for spatial autocorrelation in terms of elapsed days from study entry, the average actual variable direct cost of an USV was $3,261; hospitalizations averaged $4,175 whereas emergency room visits alone averaged $145. Although total scores of the HR-QOL questionnaires were not related to USV, single items from the SDS and the FACT were associated with USV. Other factors associated with USV were higher income, advanced stage of cancer, lymphoma, and combined cancer treatment. Results from this study suggest that USV are a significant problem and that use of a few items from the SDS and FACT may be useful in identifying those at high risk for USV.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:43Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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