The Effect of a Structured Exercise Program on Fatigue, Strength, Endurance, Physical Self-Efficacy, and Functional Wellness in Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165449
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of a Structured Exercise Program on Fatigue, Strength, Endurance, Physical Self-Efficacy, and Functional Wellness in Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Crowley, S.
Author Details:
S. Crowley, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Abstract:
Cancer treatment-related fatigue is a distressing effect of cancer therapy. Early efforts on describing the fatigue experience, have progressed to testing potential interventions. This study will build on the fatigue, functional capacity, and exercise activity of previous studies (MacVicar et al 1989; Mock et al 1994, 1997, 2001; and Schwartz 2000). Strength training, and the nature of the relationship of physical self-efficacy and performance to functional wellness will contribute new understanding to this area of fatigue and symptom management. Purpose: The purpose of this 13-week study is to test the effectiveness of a structured exercise program in decreasing fatigue, increasing strength and endurance, increasing physical self-efficacy, and enhancing perceptions of functional wellness in women undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy (Adriamycin and Cytoxan) for early stage breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The conceptual model identifies relationships among the focal concepts of cancer treatment-related fatigue, performance, physical self-efficacy, and functional wellness. The structured exercise program is the predictor variable being tested. Methods: A randomized, two-group repeated measures experimental design. The current sample of 22 women (36-58 years) is randomized to control (n=9) and intervention (n=13) groups. Both groups were tested at weeks 1 and 13 for endurance (VO2max) and strength (1-Repetition Maximum). Measurement of fatigue (Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, Attentional Functional Index), physical self-efficacy (Physical Self-Efficacy Subscale), and functional wellness (SF-36 and Functional Wellness Questionnaire) occurred at weeks 1, 7, and 13. Data Analysis: Preliminary analysis found significant differences between the groups in VO2max from weeks 1 to 13. Significant differences in activity also existed between the two groups. No significant differences in the total fatigue or physical self-efficacy scores were found between the two groups. Functional wellness was significant at week 7 between the two groups. Significant correlations were found between fatigue, vitality, attentional fatigue, and physical self-efficacy. The SF-36 physical functioning subscale significantly correlated to physical self-efficacy. Findings and Implications: Preliminary findings support the positive role of exercise in increasing endurance during adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of a Structured Exercise Program on Fatigue, Strength, Endurance, Physical Self-Efficacy, and Functional Wellness in Women With Early Stage Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Crowley, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165449-
dc.description.abstractCancer treatment-related fatigue is a distressing effect of cancer therapy. Early efforts on describing the fatigue experience, have progressed to testing potential interventions. This study will build on the fatigue, functional capacity, and exercise activity of previous studies (MacVicar et al 1989; Mock et al 1994, 1997, 2001; and Schwartz 2000). Strength training, and the nature of the relationship of physical self-efficacy and performance to functional wellness will contribute new understanding to this area of fatigue and symptom management. Purpose: The purpose of this 13-week study is to test the effectiveness of a structured exercise program in decreasing fatigue, increasing strength and endurance, increasing physical self-efficacy, and enhancing perceptions of functional wellness in women undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy (Adriamycin and Cytoxan) for early stage breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The conceptual model identifies relationships among the focal concepts of cancer treatment-related fatigue, performance, physical self-efficacy, and functional wellness. The structured exercise program is the predictor variable being tested. Methods: A randomized, two-group repeated measures experimental design. The current sample of 22 women (36-58 years) is randomized to control (n=9) and intervention (n=13) groups. Both groups were tested at weeks 1 and 13 for endurance (VO2max) and strength (1-Repetition Maximum). Measurement of fatigue (Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, Attentional Functional Index), physical self-efficacy (Physical Self-Efficacy Subscale), and functional wellness (SF-36 and Functional Wellness Questionnaire) occurred at weeks 1, 7, and 13. Data Analysis: Preliminary analysis found significant differences between the groups in VO2max from weeks 1 to 13. Significant differences in activity also existed between the two groups. No significant differences in the total fatigue or physical self-efficacy scores were found between the two groups. Functional wellness was significant at week 7 between the two groups. Significant correlations were found between fatigue, vitality, attentional fatigue, and physical self-efficacy. The SF-36 physical functioning subscale significantly correlated to physical self-efficacy. Findings and Implications: Preliminary findings support the positive role of exercise in increasing endurance during adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:44Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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