Caregiver Unmet Needs, Burden, and Satisfaction in Symptomatic Advanced Cancer Patients at a VA Medical Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165450
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiver Unmet Needs, Burden, and Satisfaction in Symptomatic Advanced Cancer Patients at a VA Medical Center
Author(s):
Davis, C .; Hwang, S.; Alejandro, Y.; Osenenko, P.; Chang, V.; Zhang, Q.
Author Details:
C. Davis, DVA New Jersey Healthcare System, East Orange, New Jersey, USA; S. Hwang; Y. Alejandro; P. Osenenko; V. Chang; Q. Zhang
Abstract:
Advanced cancer patients usually experience a significant symptom burden that can lead to multiple needs for both patients and their caregivers. A significant role of the oncology nurse is to address both caregiver and patient needs in order to optimize health care outcomes. Purpose: Caregiver outcomes among those caring for symptomatic advanced cancer patients at VA Medical Centers have not been reported. The purposes of this study were (1) to identify caregiver characteristics and their unmet needs, (2) to examine the association between caregiver unmet needs, caregiver burden, and caregiver satisfaction, and (3) to identify the independent predictors of different caregiver outcomes. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Caregiver burden and satisfaction assessment were guided by the stressor and the fulfillment theories, respectively. Methods: One hundred caregivers completed three outcome instruments: Family Inventory of Needs (FIN), Care Strain Index (CSI), and Family Satisfaction with Advanced Cancer Care (FAMCARE). The caregivers’ demographics and their function, depression, health status, and social support status and the caregivers’ perception of the patients’ unmet needs (PPUN) were obtained. Data Analysis: Principal component analysis was performed to examine the underlying dimensions of caregiver outcome measures. Pearson correlation and stepwise multivariate regression analyses were performed. Findings and Implications: The validity and reliability of caregiver outcome measurements were confirmed. The median age was 62 (range=27-85); 97% were female; 60% were spouses; and most were Caucasian (56%) or African American (32%). Spouse caregivers had significantly higher unemployment rates, higher depression scores, and lower social support scores than non-spouse caregivers. The median number of unmet needs was 2 and the median CSI score was 4. Most of unmet needs were related to information and symptom management. The majority of caregivers were satisfied or very satisfied by the care patients received. The PPUN (â=0.45,p< 0.0001) and the caregiver’s depression score (â=0.21,p=0.03) independently predicted caregiver burden (R2=0.29,p<0.00001). The PPUN (â=-0.47,p<0.0001) also predicted caregiver unmet needs (R2=0.25,p<0.00001). The presence of caregiver unmet needs (â=0.25,p<0.01) was the only independent predictor of caregiver satisfaction (R2=0.12,p<0.008). Conclusion: From this analysis, the Caregiver Outcome Model was proposed, which needs to be further validated in a broader cohort of caregivers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiver Unmet Needs, Burden, and Satisfaction in Symptomatic Advanced Cancer Patients at a VA Medical Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavis, C .en_US
dc.contributor.authorHwang, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlejandro, Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOsenenko, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Q.en_US
dc.author.detailsC. Davis, DVA New Jersey Healthcare System, East Orange, New Jersey, USA; S. Hwang; Y. Alejandro; P. Osenenko; V. Chang; Q. Zhangen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165450-
dc.description.abstractAdvanced cancer patients usually experience a significant symptom burden that can lead to multiple needs for both patients and their caregivers. A significant role of the oncology nurse is to address both caregiver and patient needs in order to optimize health care outcomes. Purpose: Caregiver outcomes among those caring for symptomatic advanced cancer patients at VA Medical Centers have not been reported. The purposes of this study were (1) to identify caregiver characteristics and their unmet needs, (2) to examine the association between caregiver unmet needs, caregiver burden, and caregiver satisfaction, and (3) to identify the independent predictors of different caregiver outcomes. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Caregiver burden and satisfaction assessment were guided by the stressor and the fulfillment theories, respectively. Methods: One hundred caregivers completed three outcome instruments: Family Inventory of Needs (FIN), Care Strain Index (CSI), and Family Satisfaction with Advanced Cancer Care (FAMCARE). The caregivers&rsquo; demographics and their function, depression, health status, and social support status and the caregivers&rsquo; perception of the patients&rsquo; unmet needs (PPUN) were obtained. Data Analysis: Principal component analysis was performed to examine the underlying dimensions of caregiver outcome measures. Pearson correlation and stepwise multivariate regression analyses were performed. Findings and Implications: The validity and reliability of caregiver outcome measurements were confirmed. The median age was 62 (range=27-85); 97% were female; 60% were spouses; and most were Caucasian (56%) or African American (32%). Spouse caregivers had significantly higher unemployment rates, higher depression scores, and lower social support scores than non-spouse caregivers. The median number of unmet needs was 2 and the median CSI score was 4. Most of unmet needs were related to information and symptom management. The majority of caregivers were satisfied or very satisfied by the care patients received. The PPUN (&acirc;=0.45,p&lt; 0.0001) and the caregiver&rsquo;s depression score (&acirc;=0.21,p=0.03) independently predicted caregiver burden (R2=0.29,p&lt;0.00001). The PPUN (&acirc;=-0.47,p&lt;0.0001) also predicted caregiver unmet needs (R2=0.25,p&lt;0.00001). The presence of caregiver unmet needs (&acirc;=0.25,p&lt;0.01) was the only independent predictor of caregiver satisfaction (R2=0.12,p&lt;0.008). Conclusion: From this analysis, the Caregiver Outcome Model was proposed, which needs to be further validated in a broader cohort of caregivers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:46Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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