Ageist Attitudes Among Nurses: Implications for Long-Term Nursing Care of Elder Clients With Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165451
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ageist Attitudes Among Nurses: Implications for Long-Term Nursing Care of Elder Clients With Cancer
Author(s):
Demers-Anderson, K.; Gillespie
Author Details:
K. Demers-Anderson, Winship Cancer Institute, VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Gillespie
Abstract:
Ageist Attitudes Among Nurses: Implications for the Long Term Nursing Care of Elder Clients with Cancer Purpose: Nurses bring with them into their profession a lifetime of cultural, familial, and perceptual attitudes regarding elder individuals with cancer. By the year 2012, over 15% of the United States population will be over the age of sixty-five. A large percentage of nursing care will be focused on caring for the elderly and a significant number of those elderly will be cancer patients living in nursing homes. Generally, cultural perceptions in America have historically viewed aged individuals with a particular set of negative characteristics including frail, feeble-minded, useless, powerless, and even expendable. Data show that elderly cancer patients are often treated with suboptimal therapy and are infrequently enrolled on clinical trials. Ageist attitudes foster stereotyping of elder clients that may have negative healthcare consequences over time. Thus, long term nursing care for the elderly client with cancer calls for specialized knowledge, skills, and abilities to deliver care without prejudice. This study presents the following research questions: What are the views of nurses in nursing homes toward their elderly clients with cancer? How do ageist attitudes among nurses affect their care of elder clients with cancer in a long-term care environment? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Using a qualitative study approach and existing theoretical constructs in a phenomenological framework, nursing knowledge for evidenced-based practice would be gained. Methods: A purposive sampling of a minimum of ten accessible nurses working in long-term care with cancer patients will be invited to participate. Data collection will consist of in-depth ninety-minute interviews using open-ended questions. Data Analysis: Data analysis will be performed until data saturation is gained. Themes derived from the narratives will be extracted and classified. Findings and Implications: The aim of this qualitative study is to uncover themes derived from the narratives that will provide insights into the construct of ageist attitudes among nurses through their lived experiences. Accordingly, these themes may provide nurse educators and managers the information needed to design interventions for nursing education and development, based on enhanced understanding of the attitudinal dynamics of caring for the elderly with cancer in a long term care facility.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAgeist Attitudes Among Nurses: Implications for Long-Term Nursing Care of Elder Clients With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDemers-Anderson, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGillespieen_US
dc.author.detailsK. Demers-Anderson, Winship Cancer Institute, VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Gillespieen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165451-
dc.description.abstractAgeist Attitudes Among Nurses: Implications for the Long Term Nursing Care of Elder Clients with Cancer Purpose: Nurses bring with them into their profession a lifetime of cultural, familial, and perceptual attitudes regarding elder individuals with cancer. By the year 2012, over 15% of the United States population will be over the age of sixty-five. A large percentage of nursing care will be focused on caring for the elderly and a significant number of those elderly will be cancer patients living in nursing homes. Generally, cultural perceptions in America have historically viewed aged individuals with a particular set of negative characteristics including frail, feeble-minded, useless, powerless, and even expendable. Data show that elderly cancer patients are often treated with suboptimal therapy and are infrequently enrolled on clinical trials. Ageist attitudes foster stereotyping of elder clients that may have negative healthcare consequences over time. Thus, long term nursing care for the elderly client with cancer calls for specialized knowledge, skills, and abilities to deliver care without prejudice. This study presents the following research questions: What are the views of nurses in nursing homes toward their elderly clients with cancer? How do ageist attitudes among nurses affect their care of elder clients with cancer in a long-term care environment? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Using a qualitative study approach and existing theoretical constructs in a phenomenological framework, nursing knowledge for evidenced-based practice would be gained. Methods: A purposive sampling of a minimum of ten accessible nurses working in long-term care with cancer patients will be invited to participate. Data collection will consist of in-depth ninety-minute interviews using open-ended questions. Data Analysis: Data analysis will be performed until data saturation is gained. Themes derived from the narratives will be extracted and classified. Findings and Implications: The aim of this qualitative study is to uncover themes derived from the narratives that will provide insights into the construct of ageist attitudes among nurses through their lived experiences. Accordingly, these themes may provide nurse educators and managers the information needed to design interventions for nursing education and development, based on enhanced understanding of the attitudinal dynamics of caring for the elderly with cancer in a long term care facility.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:47Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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