2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165452
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exercise: An Intervention for Fatigue in Cancer Patients (Interim Analysis)
Author(s):
Dodd, M.; Painter, P.; Miaskowski, C.; Paul S.; Duda, J.
Author Details:
M. Dodd, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA; P. Painter; C. Miaskowski; S. Paul; J. Duda
Abstract:
Fatigue is a common symptom associated with chemotherapy (CTX). Preliminary studies have reported the benefits of exercise on fatigue; none have investigated the timing of the exercise. The purpose of the larger randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to test the effectiveness of the PRO-SELF: FATIGUE CONTROL program, an individually tailored exercise program. Purpose: The purpose of this interim analysis is to test the effectiveness of the PRO-SELF intervention according to the timing (i.e., during versus after CTX) on fatigue. The Integrated Fatigue Model provided the framework for the RCT. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The entire sample includes 100 women with breast cancer who are starting their first course of CTX. The interim analysis includes 56 women who have completed the study, and their average age is 49.5 years. Design. The RCT involves 3 groups who are assessed at: baseline (T1), completion of CTX (T2), and at the end of the study (T3). Group 1 (EE) receives the intervention through to the end of the study (T3). Group 2 (CE) receives standard care through to the completion of CTX (T2) and then the intervention through to the end of study (T3). Group 3 (CC) receives standard care through to the end of study (T3). Methods: The Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) was administered at T1, T2, & T3. The PFS is a 22-item numeric rating scale (ranging 0-10, with descriptive anchors) that measures dimensions of subjective fatigue. The PFS has established reliability and validity (Piper, et al. 1997). Data Analysis: A repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to determine the differences of the average total PFS scores among the 3 groups over time. Findings and Implications: There was a significant change in the average total PFS scores over time, F= 4.07, p=.02, specifically between the T2 and T3 (F= 6.05, p=.017). However, there was no significant main effect by group (p=0.69). The average total PFS scores were low ranging from 2.9 at T1, to 3.4 at T2, to 2.6 at T3. Conclusion. This interim analysis does not show a benefit to those participants who received the exercise intervention, including implications for the timing of the exercise intervention on fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExercise: An Intervention for Fatigue in Cancer Patients (Interim Analysis)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPainter, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPaul S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuda, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Dodd, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA; P. Painter; C. Miaskowski; S. Paul; J. Dudaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165452-
dc.description.abstractFatigue is a common symptom associated with chemotherapy (CTX). Preliminary studies have reported the benefits of exercise on fatigue; none have investigated the timing of the exercise. The purpose of the larger randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to test the effectiveness of the PRO-SELF: FATIGUE CONTROL program, an individually tailored exercise program. Purpose: The purpose of this interim analysis is to test the effectiveness of the PRO-SELF intervention according to the timing (i.e., during versus after CTX) on fatigue. The Integrated Fatigue Model provided the framework for the RCT. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The entire sample includes 100 women with breast cancer who are starting their first course of CTX. The interim analysis includes 56 women who have completed the study, and their average age is 49.5 years. Design. The RCT involves 3 groups who are assessed at: baseline (T1), completion of CTX (T2), and at the end of the study (T3). Group 1 (EE) receives the intervention through to the end of the study (T3). Group 2 (CE) receives standard care through to the completion of CTX (T2) and then the intervention through to the end of study (T3). Group 3 (CC) receives standard care through to the end of study (T3). Methods: The Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) was administered at T1, T2, & T3. The PFS is a 22-item numeric rating scale (ranging 0-10, with descriptive anchors) that measures dimensions of subjective fatigue. The PFS has established reliability and validity (Piper, et al. 1997). Data Analysis: A repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to determine the differences of the average total PFS scores among the 3 groups over time. Findings and Implications: There was a significant change in the average total PFS scores over time, F= 4.07, p=.02, specifically between the T2 and T3 (F= 6.05, p=.017). However, there was no significant main effect by group (p=0.69). The average total PFS scores were low ranging from 2.9 at T1, to 3.4 at T2, to 2.6 at T3. Conclusion. This interim analysis does not show a benefit to those participants who received the exercise intervention, including implications for the timing of the exercise intervention on fatigue.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:48Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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