Decreasing Symptom Limitations: Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165453
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreasing Symptom Limitations: Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention
Author(s):
Doorenbos, A.; Given, B.; Given, C.; McCorkle, R.; Cimprich, B.
Author Details:
A. Doorenbos, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; B. Given; C. Given; R. McCorkle; B. Cimprich
Abstract:
Symptom limitations have a significant negative influence on quality of life among cancer patients. It is important for oncology nurses to gain an understanding of interventions that ameliorate impact of symptom limitations. Purpose: This study seeks to determine if a cognitive behavioral intervention decreases the impact of symptom limitations among newly diagnosed cancer patients who are receiving chemotherapy. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The intervention was based on Cognitive Behavioral Theory and focused on four problem-solving intervention strategies: self-care management, providing information and decision-making, counseling and support, and communication with providers. Methods: This randomized control trial of 10-contacts over 20 weeks among 237 (118 experimental and 119 control group) solid tumor cancer patients used an iterative cognitive behavioral intervention by the nurse and patient working collaboratively to identify needs and adapting the intervention to the patients’ needs based on fifteen common cancer symptoms in the experimental group. The control group continued to receive conventional care. Interviews occurred at baseline, 10 weeks, 20 weeks, and 32 weeks. Data Analysis: A two level Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used. Level-1 is the equation for the trajectory of each individual representing change over time within person or the repeated measures (i.e. the 4 interviews of a cancer patient). Level-2 explains that trajectory via person-specific characteristics. Findings and Implications: Findings include higher scores of symptom limitation in the control group compared to patients receiving the intervention at 10 weeks (p=.001), 20 weeks (p=.004) and 32 weeks (p=.055). At the onset of the study younger patients reported more symptom limitations than their older counterparts; however, this was reversed by the end of the study. The results corroborate previous studies that report positive effects of cognitive behavioral intervention among cancer patients. Findings also suggest cognitive behavioral intervention focused on symptoms may help younger cancer patients decrease symptom limitations which may help to improve their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreasing Symptom Limitations: Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral Interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoorenbos, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCorkle, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCimprich, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. Doorenbos, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; B. Given; C. Given; R. McCorkle; B. Cimprichen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165453-
dc.description.abstractSymptom limitations have a significant negative influence on quality of life among cancer patients. It is important for oncology nurses to gain an understanding of interventions that ameliorate impact of symptom limitations. Purpose: This study seeks to determine if a cognitive behavioral intervention decreases the impact of symptom limitations among newly diagnosed cancer patients who are receiving chemotherapy. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The intervention was based on Cognitive Behavioral Theory and focused on four problem-solving intervention strategies: self-care management, providing information and decision-making, counseling and support, and communication with providers. Methods: This randomized control trial of 10-contacts over 20 weeks among 237 (118 experimental and 119 control group) solid tumor cancer patients used an iterative cognitive behavioral intervention by the nurse and patient working collaboratively to identify needs and adapting the intervention to the patients’ needs based on fifteen common cancer symptoms in the experimental group. The control group continued to receive conventional care. Interviews occurred at baseline, 10 weeks, 20 weeks, and 32 weeks. Data Analysis: A two level Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used. Level-1 is the equation for the trajectory of each individual representing change over time within person or the repeated measures (i.e. the 4 interviews of a cancer patient). Level-2 explains that trajectory via person-specific characteristics. Findings and Implications: Findings include higher scores of symptom limitation in the control group compared to patients receiving the intervention at 10 weeks (p=.001), 20 weeks (p=.004) and 32 weeks (p=.055). At the onset of the study younger patients reported more symptom limitations than their older counterparts; however, this was reversed by the end of the study. The results corroborate previous studies that report positive effects of cognitive behavioral intervention among cancer patients. Findings also suggest cognitive behavioral intervention focused on symptoms may help younger cancer patients decrease symptom limitations which may help to improve their quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:49Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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