Perceptions of Anxiety and Pain in Cancer Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Biopsy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165458
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Anxiety and Pain in Cancer Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Biopsy
Author(s):
Grabowski, M.; Hawkins, J.; Mortimer, J.; Ahmad, F.; Naughton, M.
Author Details:
M. Grabowski, Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; J. Hawkins; J. Mortimer; F. Ahmad; M. Naughton
Abstract:
Cancer patients commonly undergo bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. Pain and anxiety are known complications of this procedure, but methods for improving the biopsy experience in adults have not been well studied. Nurses can have a positive impact since nurses frequently perform or assist this procedure. Purpose: We performed a pilot study to systemically assess incidence and severity of anxiety and pain for patients undergoing diagnostic marrow aspirate and biopsy. Additionally, we wanted to identify concerns patients have associated with the experience of the bone marrow biopsy procedure. Theoretical/Scientific framework: We used as conceptual framework the Lazarus theory of stress and coping. Stress is examined on multiple levels such as cognitive, physical, environmental, and social (Lazarus & Launier, 1978). Methods: Patients provided informed consent. Patients were asked to score pain and anxiety before and 15 minutes after the procedure, using a 0-10 verbal scale. Patients were again surveyed by telephone 24-32 hours after the procedure. Data analysis: Descriptive and correlational statistics were used. 50 patients completed the initial study and 45 were contacted for follow-up one day later. Most procedures (37-50) were performed by nurse coordinators. Mean pain scores at 15 min and 24 hours after the procedure were not statistically different from scores reported before the procedure. Subjective assessment of patient responses during the procedure suggested that many experienced significant pain; however intra-procedure pain scores were not specifically recorded in this study. Patients reported significantly higher anxiety scores before the procedure than immediately after or 24 hours later. Findings and implications: Only a minority of patients reported substantial pain after the procedure or one day later, but patients reported significant anxiety before the procedure. These pilot results will be used to base research interventions targeted at anxiety before and pain during the procedure in patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Anxiety and Pain in Cancer Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Biopsyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrabowski, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAhmad, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNaughton, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Grabowski, Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; J. Hawkins; J. Mortimer; F. Ahmad; M. Naughtonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165458-
dc.description.abstractCancer patients commonly undergo bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. Pain and anxiety are known complications of this procedure, but methods for improving the biopsy experience in adults have not been well studied. Nurses can have a positive impact since nurses frequently perform or assist this procedure. Purpose: We performed a pilot study to systemically assess incidence and severity of anxiety and pain for patients undergoing diagnostic marrow aspirate and biopsy. Additionally, we wanted to identify concerns patients have associated with the experience of the bone marrow biopsy procedure. Theoretical/Scientific framework: We used as conceptual framework the Lazarus theory of stress and coping. Stress is examined on multiple levels such as cognitive, physical, environmental, and social (Lazarus & Launier, 1978). Methods: Patients provided informed consent. Patients were asked to score pain and anxiety before and 15 minutes after the procedure, using a 0-10 verbal scale. Patients were again surveyed by telephone 24-32 hours after the procedure. Data analysis: Descriptive and correlational statistics were used. 50 patients completed the initial study and 45 were contacted for follow-up one day later. Most procedures (37-50) were performed by nurse coordinators. Mean pain scores at 15 min and 24 hours after the procedure were not statistically different from scores reported before the procedure. Subjective assessment of patient responses during the procedure suggested that many experienced significant pain; however intra-procedure pain scores were not specifically recorded in this study. Patients reported significantly higher anxiety scores before the procedure than immediately after or 24 hours later. Findings and implications: Only a minority of patients reported substantial pain after the procedure or one day later, but patients reported significant anxiety before the procedure. These pilot results will be used to base research interventions targeted at anxiety before and pain during the procedure in patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:54Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.