Fatigue, Physical Activity, Health Status, and Quality of Life in Stem Cell Transplant Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165460
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue, Physical Activity, Health Status, and Quality of Life in Stem Cell Transplant Patients
Author(s):
Hacker, Ed; Ferrans, C.; Ravandi, F.; van Besien, K.
Author Details:
Ed Hacker, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA; C. Ferrans; F. Ravandi; K. van Besien
Abstract:
Stem cell transplantation (SCT) potentially impacts all aspects of a patient's life, particularly during the acute post-transplant period. Problems such as fatigue and decreased physical activity may result in long-term consequences and diminished quality of life (QOL). Purpose: Very little is known about the patterns of fatigue, physical activity, health status, and QOL during this period. Obtaining subjective data is difficult as patients are frequently too ill to complete long questionnaires or participate in lengthy interviews. It is equally difficult to obtain objective physical activity data. This study examined fatigue, physical activity, health status, and QOL immediately following SCT. The feasibility of using wrist actigraphy with a subjective event marker as a patient tolerable means for obtaining fatigue and physical activity data was also examined. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Wilson and Cleary’s Conceptual Model of Patient Outcomes guided the study. Methods: This feasibility study used a prospective, repeated measures design. The convenience sample (n=20) was drawn from two academic medical centers. Subjects were assessed over a five-day period pretransplant and immediately post-transplant (days 4-8). Subjects wore a wrist actigraph to measure physical activity. Subjects rated their fatigue intensity three times daily, entering this information directly into the subjective event marker of the wrist actigraph. At the end of both five-day periods, subjects completed the EORTC QLQ C-30 and the QLI. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Findings and Implications: Study results indicate that physical activity significantly declined following SCT (p<0.001). This decline coincided with diminished physical (p<0.05), emotional (p<0.01), role (p<0.01), and cognitive (p<0.05) functioning. Symptoms experienced increased during the acute post transplant period (fatigue, p<0.001; pain, p<0.001; nausea/vomiting, p<0.001; sleep disturbances, p<0.01; appetite loss, p<0.001; and diarrhea, p<0.001). Quality of life was significantly worse (p<0.005). Findings suggest that SCT patients experience reduced physical activity, diminished functioning, increased, symptoms and poorer QOL during the acute post-transplant period. Findings demonstrate that it is feasible to obtain fatigue, physical activity, health status, and QOL information if the patient burden is reasonable. This information can be used to develop interventions that alleviate symptoms, increase physical activity, improve health status, and QOL.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue, Physical Activity, Health Status, and Quality of Life in Stem Cell Transplant Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHacker, Eden_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrans, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRavandi, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Besien, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsEd Hacker, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA; C. Ferrans; F. Ravandi; K. van Besienen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165460-
dc.description.abstractStem cell transplantation (SCT) potentially impacts all aspects of a patient's life, particularly during the acute post-transplant period. Problems such as fatigue and decreased physical activity may result in long-term consequences and diminished quality of life (QOL). Purpose: Very little is known about the patterns of fatigue, physical activity, health status, and QOL during this period. Obtaining subjective data is difficult as patients are frequently too ill to complete long questionnaires or participate in lengthy interviews. It is equally difficult to obtain objective physical activity data. This study examined fatigue, physical activity, health status, and QOL immediately following SCT. The feasibility of using wrist actigraphy with a subjective event marker as a patient tolerable means for obtaining fatigue and physical activity data was also examined. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Wilson and Cleary&rsquo;s Conceptual Model of Patient Outcomes guided the study. Methods: This feasibility study used a prospective, repeated measures design. The convenience sample (n=20) was drawn from two academic medical centers. Subjects were assessed over a five-day period pretransplant and immediately post-transplant (days 4-8). Subjects wore a wrist actigraph to measure physical activity. Subjects rated their fatigue intensity three times daily, entering this information directly into the subjective event marker of the wrist actigraph. At the end of both five-day periods, subjects completed the EORTC QLQ C-30 and the QLI. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Findings and Implications: Study results indicate that physical activity significantly declined following SCT (p&lt;0.001). This decline coincided with diminished physical (p&lt;0.05), emotional (p&lt;0.01), role (p&lt;0.01), and cognitive (p&lt;0.05) functioning. Symptoms experienced increased during the acute post transplant period (fatigue, p&lt;0.001; pain, p&lt;0.001; nausea/vomiting, p&lt;0.001; sleep disturbances, p&lt;0.01; appetite loss, p&lt;0.001; and diarrhea, p&lt;0.001). Quality of life was significantly worse (p&lt;0.005). Findings suggest that SCT patients experience reduced physical activity, diminished functioning, increased, symptoms and poorer QOL during the acute post-transplant period. Findings demonstrate that it is feasible to obtain fatigue, physical activity, health status, and QOL information if the patient burden is reasonable. This information can be used to develop interventions that alleviate symptoms, increase physical activity, improve health status, and QOL.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:57Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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