Understanding the Cancer Pain Experience in the Plains Native American Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165461
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the Cancer Pain Experience in the Plains Native American Population
Author(s):
Haozous, E.
Author Details:
E. Haozous, Yale University, SON, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Abstract:
It has been well documented that cancer pain is undertreated in minority populations. Nurses are frequently the primary individuals responsible for pain assessment. Understanding the cultural context in which a population operates will assist nurses in identifying and managing cancer pain in that group of people. Purpose: This descriptive study of 10 subjects with cancer from the Crow, Northern Cheyenne and Sioux tribes explored how they talked about their pain, what they expected to be done for their pain, and methods of coping they used to control their cancer symptoms. This knowledge will assist nurses in developing better interventions to identify and manage cancer pain in Native American patients from the northern plains region of the United States. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This study was conducted under the theoretical base of Madeliene Leininger’s Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality. According to this theory, culturally congruent care is facilitated by the nurse's understanding of the cultural context of an experience. Examining the meaning, vocabulary and traditional remedies for cancer pain and understanding their interplay as described in Leininger’s Sunrise Model for Culture Congruent Care allows nursing care, decisions and actions to be positively influenced in a manner that preserves the cultural integrity of the patient while delivering effective care. Methods: The purpose of this study is to explore Plains Indian experience of cancer pain in order to develop culturally appropriate means of measuring cancer pain within the Plains Indian population. The study will also investigate the attitudes this population has about pain control and their expectations for pharmacologic intervention with cancer pain. The sample is a convenience sample of a group of self-selected adult Plains NA individuals who were either currently experiencing cancer pain or had experienced cancer pain in the past. The sample was recruited through referral from their Oncology care providers. Each study participant was asked to fill out a simple demographic questionnaire for the purpose of obtaining information on gender, age, cancer diagnosis, tribal affiliation, level of education, analgesic medications being used, and economic status. Every subject was asked to complete the Brief Pain Inventory. Interviews were semi-structured and had a total of nine questions concerning cancer pain, description of pain and expectations regarding pain. Data Analysis: Analysis of the data was quantitative and qualitative. The BPI data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistical analysis. Field notes were taken during the interviews. The researcher transcribed the audio recordings made of the interviews. The transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed one by one. In addition, Dr. M. Tish Knobf, PhD also independently reviewed three interviews as well as the coded and analyzed content of all the interviews. Repeated themes, ideas or phenomenon were labeled and coded according to frequency. Additionally, transcribed interviews were arranged using a “cut and paste” method, in which comments were organized and arranged in tables according to thematic material. Findings and Implications: On the BPI, subjects reported mild to moderate pain on a daily basis. The results of the BPI analysis also showed that the sample did experience mild to moderate interference with their quality of life as a direct result of their pain. When interviewed, the subjects discussed the way they described their pain, what their pain meant, and other bothersome symptoms. They also described the ways in which they experienced social isolation as a consequence of their cancer pain. The subjects selected certain people with whom they disclosed their pain. They relied on prescription and non-prescription medication for pain relief. Implications for practice include the need for discussion of quality of life indicators when conducting a thorough pain assessment once a trusting relationship is established. Suggestions for future research include further investigation into the meaning and experience of social isolation as a consequence of cancer pain.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the Cancer Pain Experience in the Plains Native American Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaozous, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsE. Haozous, Yale University, SON, New Haven, Connecticut, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165461-
dc.description.abstractIt has been well documented that cancer pain is undertreated in minority populations. Nurses are frequently the primary individuals responsible for pain assessment. Understanding the cultural context in which a population operates will assist nurses in identifying and managing cancer pain in that group of people. Purpose: This descriptive study of 10 subjects with cancer from the Crow, Northern Cheyenne and Sioux tribes explored how they talked about their pain, what they expected to be done for their pain, and methods of coping they used to control their cancer symptoms. This knowledge will assist nurses in developing better interventions to identify and manage cancer pain in Native American patients from the northern plains region of the United States. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This study was conducted under the theoretical base of Madeliene Leininger’s Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality. According to this theory, culturally congruent care is facilitated by the nurse's understanding of the cultural context of an experience. Examining the meaning, vocabulary and traditional remedies for cancer pain and understanding their interplay as described in Leininger’s Sunrise Model for Culture Congruent Care allows nursing care, decisions and actions to be positively influenced in a manner that preserves the cultural integrity of the patient while delivering effective care. Methods: The purpose of this study is to explore Plains Indian experience of cancer pain in order to develop culturally appropriate means of measuring cancer pain within the Plains Indian population. The study will also investigate the attitudes this population has about pain control and their expectations for pharmacologic intervention with cancer pain. The sample is a convenience sample of a group of self-selected adult Plains NA individuals who were either currently experiencing cancer pain or had experienced cancer pain in the past. The sample was recruited through referral from their Oncology care providers. Each study participant was asked to fill out a simple demographic questionnaire for the purpose of obtaining information on gender, age, cancer diagnosis, tribal affiliation, level of education, analgesic medications being used, and economic status. Every subject was asked to complete the Brief Pain Inventory. Interviews were semi-structured and had a total of nine questions concerning cancer pain, description of pain and expectations regarding pain. Data Analysis: Analysis of the data was quantitative and qualitative. The BPI data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistical analysis. Field notes were taken during the interviews. The researcher transcribed the audio recordings made of the interviews. The transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed one by one. In addition, Dr. M. Tish Knobf, PhD also independently reviewed three interviews as well as the coded and analyzed content of all the interviews. Repeated themes, ideas or phenomenon were labeled and coded according to frequency. Additionally, transcribed interviews were arranged using a “cut and paste” method, in which comments were organized and arranged in tables according to thematic material. Findings and Implications: On the BPI, subjects reported mild to moderate pain on a daily basis. The results of the BPI analysis also showed that the sample did experience mild to moderate interference with their quality of life as a direct result of their pain. When interviewed, the subjects discussed the way they described their pain, what their pain meant, and other bothersome symptoms. They also described the ways in which they experienced social isolation as a consequence of their cancer pain. The subjects selected certain people with whom they disclosed their pain. They relied on prescription and non-prescription medication for pain relief. Implications for practice include the need for discussion of quality of life indicators when conducting a thorough pain assessment once a trusting relationship is established. Suggestions for future research include further investigation into the meaning and experience of social isolation as a consequence of cancer pain.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:58Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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