Commencing Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: What Should Nursing Assessment Involve?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165462
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Commencing Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: What Should Nursing Assessment Involve?
Author(s):
Hargraves, M.; Yates, P.; Aranda, S.; Mirolo, B.
Author Details:
M. Hargraves, Hematology & Oncology Clinics of Australia, Queensland, Australia; P. Yates; S. Aranda; B. Mirolo
Abstract:
Adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer is today routinely provided in ambulatory care settings. The development of models of care appropriate for addressing the broad range of support needs for women undergoing treatment in this context is an important priority. Purpose: This paper reports findings from a secondary analysis of baseline data collected for a RCT of a nurse-administered intervention for managing cancer-related fatigue. The purpose of the analysis was to identify key areas of concern for women at their first treatment visit, in order to develop evidence based health promotion strategies for implementation in ambulatory cancer centers. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The areas of concern investigated reflected key social and personal factors identified in the PRECEDE model of health behavior as being important to effective disease self management. Methods: A total of 108 women were surveyed at their first visit for adjuvant chemotherapy. The survey comprised measures of physical and psychological symptoms (EORTC QLQ-30 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) as well as a 22-item investigator developed scale assessing confidence with managing cancer and its treatment. Data Analysis: Descriptive analyses were conducted to identify mean confidence scores and quality of life ratings. Findings and Implications: Women reported moderate to high levels of confidence with coping with many aspects of cancer. On a 10-point scale ranging from 1=not at all to 10=very confident, areas of lowest confidence included ability to avoid negative thoughts (Mean=6.8, SD=2.4) and control feelings (Mean=6.9, SD=2.2). Mean quality of life scores were high (Mean 71.5, SD=20.0 on a scale ranging from 25=low QOL to 100=High QOL). However more than 28% of the sample had anxiety at levels that may be suggestive of an anxiety disorder, with a further 20% reporting anxiety levels categorized as marginal. Additionally, 6% of the sample had depression at levels that may be suggestive of clinical depression, with a further 7% reporting depression levels categorized as marginal. The study findings highlight key concerns of women attending their first treatment visit. The nature and scope of these concerns emphasizes the importance of nursing assessment that sensitively and accurately identifies emotional needs, so that supportive interventions in the context of ambulatory care can be implemented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommencing Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: What Should Nursing Assessment Involve?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHargraves, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYates, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAranda, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMirolo, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Hargraves, Hematology & Oncology Clinics of Australia, Queensland, Australia; P. Yates; S. Aranda; B. Miroloen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165462-
dc.description.abstractAdjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer is today routinely provided in ambulatory care settings. The development of models of care appropriate for addressing the broad range of support needs for women undergoing treatment in this context is an important priority. Purpose: This paper reports findings from a secondary analysis of baseline data collected for a RCT of a nurse-administered intervention for managing cancer-related fatigue. The purpose of the analysis was to identify key areas of concern for women at their first treatment visit, in order to develop evidence based health promotion strategies for implementation in ambulatory cancer centers. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The areas of concern investigated reflected key social and personal factors identified in the PRECEDE model of health behavior as being important to effective disease self management. Methods: A total of 108 women were surveyed at their first visit for adjuvant chemotherapy. The survey comprised measures of physical and psychological symptoms (EORTC QLQ-30 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) as well as a 22-item investigator developed scale assessing confidence with managing cancer and its treatment. Data Analysis: Descriptive analyses were conducted to identify mean confidence scores and quality of life ratings. Findings and Implications: Women reported moderate to high levels of confidence with coping with many aspects of cancer. On a 10-point scale ranging from 1=not at all to 10=very confident, areas of lowest confidence included ability to avoid negative thoughts (Mean=6.8, SD=2.4) and control feelings (Mean=6.9, SD=2.2). Mean quality of life scores were high (Mean 71.5, SD=20.0 on a scale ranging from 25=low QOL to 100=High QOL). However more than 28% of the sample had anxiety at levels that may be suggestive of an anxiety disorder, with a further 20% reporting anxiety levels categorized as marginal. Additionally, 6% of the sample had depression at levels that may be suggestive of clinical depression, with a further 7% reporting depression levels categorized as marginal. The study findings highlight key concerns of women attending their first treatment visit. The nature and scope of these concerns emphasizes the importance of nursing assessment that sensitively and accurately identifies emotional needs, so that supportive interventions in the context of ambulatory care can be implemented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:18:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:18:59Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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