Spiritual Care Nursing Interventions: What Cancer Patients and Their Family Caregivers Want

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165466
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Care Nursing Interventions: What Cancer Patients and Their Family Caregivers Want
Author(s):
Johnston Taylor, E.; Mamier, I.
Author Details:
E. Johnston Taylor, Loma Linda University, School of Nursing, Loma Linda, California, USA; I. Mamier
Abstract:
Oncology nurses are increasingly expected to assess spiritual needs and provide spiritual care to their clients. Purpose: Although mandated to assess and support spiritual health, oncology nurses have scanty and conflicting evidence about what are clients’ preferences or expectations with regard to receiving spiritual care from nurses. The purpose of this study was to quantify cancer patient and family caregiver preferences for spiritual care from nurses. Specific research questions included: To what extent do patients and family caregivers want to receive spiritual care from nurses? What factors are associated with wanting spiritual care nursing interventions? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Conceptually, this investigation was influenced by several scholars (especially, Reed, Frankl, and Travelbee) who have theorized about how and why spirituality is important when living with a health challenge. Spiritual care was defined as nurses’ ways of being and doing that promote spiritual health. Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive study employed paper and pencil questionnaires (a demographic form and 5 subscales [or 27 items] from the Spiritual Interests Related to Illness Scale [SpIRIT], Patient and Caregiver Versions) to collect data. The sample included 165 oncology patients and 68 caregivers who were mostly white, receiving outpatient care, and expecting a cure. Data Analysis: Measures of central tendency, Pearson correlations, and analysis of variance were used for the statistical analysis. Findings and Implications: Responses to items about receiving the spiritual care interventions listed in the SpIRIT consistently averaged between 2 (“disagree”) and 3 (“agree”), indicating less than strong enthusiasm. The most preferred interventions for both patients and caregivers included those using humor, helping them to have quiet time or space, and offering to pray privately for them. Being non-white and attending religious services frequently were associated with desiring more spiritual care from nurses. Without exception, no differences were observed between patient and caregiver responses. Understanding what clients want can help oncology nurses to inoffensively and effectively provide spiritual care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Care Nursing Interventions: What Cancer Patients and Their Family Caregivers Wanten_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnston Taylor, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMamier, I.en_US
dc.author.detailsE. Johnston Taylor, Loma Linda University, School of Nursing, Loma Linda, California, USA; I. Mamieren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165466-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses are increasingly expected to assess spiritual needs and provide spiritual care to their clients. Purpose: Although mandated to assess and support spiritual health, oncology nurses have scanty and conflicting evidence about what are clients’ preferences or expectations with regard to receiving spiritual care from nurses. The purpose of this study was to quantify cancer patient and family caregiver preferences for spiritual care from nurses. Specific research questions included: To what extent do patients and family caregivers want to receive spiritual care from nurses? What factors are associated with wanting spiritual care nursing interventions? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Conceptually, this investigation was influenced by several scholars (especially, Reed, Frankl, and Travelbee) who have theorized about how and why spirituality is important when living with a health challenge. Spiritual care was defined as nurses’ ways of being and doing that promote spiritual health. Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive study employed paper and pencil questionnaires (a demographic form and 5 subscales [or 27 items] from the Spiritual Interests Related to Illness Scale [SpIRIT], Patient and Caregiver Versions) to collect data. The sample included 165 oncology patients and 68 caregivers who were mostly white, receiving outpatient care, and expecting a cure. Data Analysis: Measures of central tendency, Pearson correlations, and analysis of variance were used for the statistical analysis. Findings and Implications: Responses to items about receiving the spiritual care interventions listed in the SpIRIT consistently averaged between 2 (“disagree”) and 3 (“agree”), indicating less than strong enthusiasm. The most preferred interventions for both patients and caregivers included those using humor, helping them to have quiet time or space, and offering to pray privately for them. Being non-white and attending religious services frequently were associated with desiring more spiritual care from nurses. Without exception, no differences were observed between patient and caregiver responses. Understanding what clients want can help oncology nurses to inoffensively and effectively provide spiritual care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:03Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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