Treatment Decision-Making for the Primary Treatment Among Chinese American Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165468
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Treatment Decision-Making for the Primary Treatment Among Chinese American Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Lee, S.; Knobf, M.
Author Details:
S. Lee, National Taipei College of Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan; M. Knobf
Abstract:
Promoting women as fully informed decision-makers for their breast cancer is important to oncology nurses. Purpose: Women reported difficulty to make the treatment decision for their breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Chinese American women in United States; but there is limited knowledge about how they make and evaluate the treatment decision. The purpose was to describe the primary treatment decision, decisional conflict, expectation, and values as the decision was made, and decisional satisfaction and regret in a sample of Chinese American women with early-stage breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Ottawa Decisional Support Framework served as the framework to identify variables in treatment decision-making and the evaluation of the decision. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. A convenience sample of 123 Chinese American women with early-stage breast cancer was recruited in the larger New York area. Data were collected on a demographic-clinic profile and four standardized instruments in Traditional Chinese with equivalence from back-translation. All four standardized instruments had appropriate reliability and validity. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed with univariate and bivariate statistic strategies by using SAS V8.0 program. Findings and Implications: The results indicated that 38% of the women had breast-conserving surgery, and the remaining of 11.4% had mastectomy plus reconstruction. The women highly valued and expected physician and family support in treatment decision-making for their breast caner, while femininity, sexuality, appearance, and attraction to the partner were less valued. The majority agreed that they were satisfied without regret. Treatment decision was related to age, options offered, surgeon and family recommendation, expectation, and value. The women who had health insurance at the time of diagnosis were more likely to have breast-conserving surgery. Decision satisfaction and regret were related to decisional conflict in treatment decision-making. The women who had received a greater amount of information, who felt more comfortable in using English, and who had utilized other resources in treatment decision-making reported lower decisional conflict, greater satisfaction, and less regret. Strategies are needed to improve communication and provide culturally relevant patient education to promote Chinese American women as fully informed decision-makers for their breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTreatment Decision-Making for the Primary Treatment Among Chinese American Women With Early-Stage Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnobf, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Lee, National Taipei College of Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan; M. Knobfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165468-
dc.description.abstractPromoting women as fully informed decision-makers for their breast cancer is important to oncology nurses. Purpose: Women reported difficulty to make the treatment decision for their breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Chinese American women in United States; but there is limited knowledge about how they make and evaluate the treatment decision. The purpose was to describe the primary treatment decision, decisional conflict, expectation, and values as the decision was made, and decisional satisfaction and regret in a sample of Chinese American women with early-stage breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Ottawa Decisional Support Framework served as the framework to identify variables in treatment decision-making and the evaluation of the decision. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. A convenience sample of 123 Chinese American women with early-stage breast cancer was recruited in the larger New York area. Data were collected on a demographic-clinic profile and four standardized instruments in Traditional Chinese with equivalence from back-translation. All four standardized instruments had appropriate reliability and validity. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed with univariate and bivariate statistic strategies by using SAS V8.0 program. Findings and Implications: The results indicated that 38% of the women had breast-conserving surgery, and the remaining of 11.4% had mastectomy plus reconstruction. The women highly valued and expected physician and family support in treatment decision-making for their breast caner, while femininity, sexuality, appearance, and attraction to the partner were less valued. The majority agreed that they were satisfied without regret. Treatment decision was related to age, options offered, surgeon and family recommendation, expectation, and value. The women who had health insurance at the time of diagnosis were more likely to have breast-conserving surgery. Decision satisfaction and regret were related to decisional conflict in treatment decision-making. The women who had received a greater amount of information, who felt more comfortable in using English, and who had utilized other resources in treatment decision-making reported lower decisional conflict, greater satisfaction, and less regret. Strategies are needed to improve communication and provide culturally relevant patient education to promote Chinese American women as fully informed decision-makers for their breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:05Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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