2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165470
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment Through Online Cancer Support Groups
Author(s):
Lin, L.; Tsai, H.; Chee, W.; Im, E.
Author Details:
L. Lin, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA; H. Tsai; W. Chee; E. Im
Abstract:
Purpose: Recent studies indicated that online cancer support groups provide an excellent setting to recruit research participants for oncology studies. Despite these recent findings, very little is still known about issues in recruitment through the online cancer support groups. Thus, at this beginning stage of Internet research, it is imperative to explore issues in recruitment through the online cancer support groups. The purpose of this presentation is to describe issues in recruitment through the online cancer support groups from a feminist perspective and propose future directions for oncology studies using the online cancer support groups. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A feminist perspective was used as a theoretical perspective. Methods: A total of 803 websites for the online cancer support groups on the Internet were retrieved using yahoo.com, msn.com, accor.org, and google.com. Among them, 162 websites were found to be eligible online cancer support groups. These websites included 100 by yahoo.com, 24 by msn.com, 8 by accor.com, and 30 by google.com. The eligibility of the websites was determined based upon the target population, purpose of the website, and number of members. The web masters and/or list owners of the eligible websites were contacted by email, and their willingness to announce the study was asked. Only 9 of them agreed to announce the study (7 by yahoo.com, one by msn.com, none by accor.org, and one by google.com). Data Analysis: During the recruitment process, issues raised in using the online cancer support groups for recruitment were discussed through weekly research meetings, and memos about the issues were written. The written memos were analyzed using a content analysis, and the criteria for rigor in feminist research by Hall and Stevens were used to theoretically guide the analysis. Findings and Implications: The analysis indicated the following four major issues: (a) intersubjectivity issues; (b) relevance issues; (c) authenticity issues; and (d) ethical issues. Eighty one percent of the websites were not user friendly. It was hard to find useful information for cancer patients in most of the websites (67%). There was a concern about the authenticity of the websites. It was not easy to identify if the website was really an online cancer support group and/or if the information presented by the websites was accurate. There were virtually no policies or standards regulating the websites of the online cancer support groups. A web owner could design a perfect, good-looking website, but she/he might present incorrect information.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment Through Online Cancer Support Groupsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLin, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTsai, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChee, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIm, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Lin, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA; H. Tsai; W. Chee; E. Imen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165470-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Recent studies indicated that online cancer support groups provide an excellent setting to recruit research participants for oncology studies. Despite these recent findings, very little is still known about issues in recruitment through the online cancer support groups. Thus, at this beginning stage of Internet research, it is imperative to explore issues in recruitment through the online cancer support groups. The purpose of this presentation is to describe issues in recruitment through the online cancer support groups from a feminist perspective and propose future directions for oncology studies using the online cancer support groups. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A feminist perspective was used as a theoretical perspective. Methods: A total of 803 websites for the online cancer support groups on the Internet were retrieved using yahoo.com, msn.com, accor.org, and google.com. Among them, 162 websites were found to be eligible online cancer support groups. These websites included 100 by yahoo.com, 24 by msn.com, 8 by accor.com, and 30 by google.com. The eligibility of the websites was determined based upon the target population, purpose of the website, and number of members. The web masters and/or list owners of the eligible websites were contacted by email, and their willingness to announce the study was asked. Only 9 of them agreed to announce the study (7 by yahoo.com, one by msn.com, none by accor.org, and one by google.com). Data Analysis: During the recruitment process, issues raised in using the online cancer support groups for recruitment were discussed through weekly research meetings, and memos about the issues were written. The written memos were analyzed using a content analysis, and the criteria for rigor in feminist research by Hall and Stevens were used to theoretically guide the analysis. Findings and Implications: The analysis indicated the following four major issues: (a) intersubjectivity issues; (b) relevance issues; (c) authenticity issues; and (d) ethical issues. Eighty one percent of the websites were not user friendly. It was hard to find useful information for cancer patients in most of the websites (67%). There was a concern about the authenticity of the websites. It was not easy to identify if the website was really an online cancer support group and/or if the information presented by the websites was accurate. There were virtually no policies or standards regulating the websites of the online cancer support groups. A web owner could design a perfect, good-looking website, but she/he might present incorrect information.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:07Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.