Characteristics, Concerns, and Cancer Reducing Practices of Women Presenting to a Comprehensive Cancer Center for Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165471
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics, Concerns, and Cancer Reducing Practices of Women Presenting to a Comprehensive Cancer Center for Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment
Author(s):
MacDonald, D.; Sarna, L.; Uman, G.; Lagos, V.; Grant, M.; Weitzel, J.
Author Details:
D. MacDonald, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California, USA; L. Sarna; G. Uman; V. Lagos; M. Grant; J. Weitzel
Abstract:
Knowledge of the characteristics, concerns, cancer risk reducing practices, and health history of women with a personal or family history of breast cancer can be important for nurses in planning supportive care for women undergoing genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). Purpose: Breast cancer before age 50, or a family history of breast cancer, may be associated with a hereditary predisposition to the disease. The study purpose was to describe the characteristics, concerns, cancer risk reducing behaviors, and health history of women unaffected or affected with breast cancer prior to GCRA and compare affected and unaffected women. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The health belief model was the overarching framework used. Methods: An investigator developed survey was sent to women with a personal or family history of breast cancer scheduled for GCRA. Validity established by expert genetic/oncology nurse researchers and in-depth individual interviews (n=10). Reliability established through a pilot testing (n=50, data published) with similar women. Eighty women with a history of breast cancer and 134 unaffected women responded to the survey. Data Analysis: Frequencies, and descriptive statistics (Chi-square, cross-tabulations, ANOVA) were used to describe key characteristics and compare affected and unaffected women. Findings and Implications: Unaffected women were younger (Mean age 45, SD 10) than women with breast cancer (Mean age 49, SD 12). Although unaffected women were more concerned about cancer than affected women (p= <.001), these concerns did not interfere with daily activities for most women. The most frequently reported personal cancer risk factors were family history, followed by genetics, environmental exposures, stress, and diet. About 40% used herbs, exercise, or dietary changes to reduce cancer risk. Anxiety or lumpy breasts were the most frequent interfering factors with breast self-exam. The majority had a clinical breast exam and mammogram yearly, would pay for mammograms if needed, and did not take a risk-reducing medication. None of the unaffected at-risk women had risk-reducing surgery although two-thirds would consider doing so. These data contribute to clinical knowledge by identifying subject characteristics, cancer worry, misconceptions, and areas for nursing educational, counseling and psychosocial interventions and identify areas for further research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics, Concerns, and Cancer Reducing Practices of Women Presenting to a Comprehensive Cancer Center for Genetic Cancer Risk Assessmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarna, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUman, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLagos, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeitzel, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsD. MacDonald, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California, USA; L. Sarna; G. Uman; V. Lagos; M. Grant; J. Weitzelen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165471-
dc.description.abstractKnowledge of the characteristics, concerns, cancer risk reducing practices, and health history of women with a personal or family history of breast cancer can be important for nurses in planning supportive care for women undergoing genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). Purpose: Breast cancer before age 50, or a family history of breast cancer, may be associated with a hereditary predisposition to the disease. The study purpose was to describe the characteristics, concerns, cancer risk reducing behaviors, and health history of women unaffected or affected with breast cancer prior to GCRA and compare affected and unaffected women. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The health belief model was the overarching framework used. Methods: An investigator developed survey was sent to women with a personal or family history of breast cancer scheduled for GCRA. Validity established by expert genetic/oncology nurse researchers and in-depth individual interviews (n=10). Reliability established through a pilot testing (n=50, data published) with similar women. Eighty women with a history of breast cancer and 134 unaffected women responded to the survey. Data Analysis: Frequencies, and descriptive statistics (Chi-square, cross-tabulations, ANOVA) were used to describe key characteristics and compare affected and unaffected women. Findings and Implications: Unaffected women were younger (Mean age 45, SD 10) than women with breast cancer (Mean age 49, SD 12). Although unaffected women were more concerned about cancer than affected women (p= &lt;.001), these concerns did not interfere with daily activities for most women. The most frequently reported personal cancer risk factors were family history, followed by genetics, environmental exposures, stress, and diet. About 40% used herbs, exercise, or dietary changes to reduce cancer risk. Anxiety or lumpy breasts were the most frequent interfering factors with breast self-exam. The majority had a clinical breast exam and mammogram yearly, would pay for mammograms if needed, and did not take a risk-reducing medication. None of the unaffected at-risk women had risk-reducing surgery although two-thirds would consider doing so. These data contribute to clinical knowledge by identifying subject characteristics, cancer worry, misconceptions, and areas for nursing educational, counseling and psychosocial interventions and identify areas for further research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:08Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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