Accelerated Loss in Functional Testing in Women Who Are Survivors of Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165472
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accelerated Loss in Functional Testing in Women Who Are Survivors of Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Mahon, S.; Caiarelli, M.
Author Details:
S. Mahon, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; M. Caiarelli
Abstract:
Accelerated Loss in Functional Testing in Women Who Are Survivors of Breast Cancer Purpose: Of the 210,000 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer annually, more than 80% are expected to survive at least five years after treatment. Most will have a normal lifespan. Discovery of breast cancer represents an immediate threat to these women. In addition, aggressive therapies have great potential for both immediate and long-term side effects. Purpose: To determine if women who have undergone cytotoxic chemotherapy for breast cancer function less well on normative tests than women who have not undergone treatment with these agents. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Roy's Adaptation Model of Nursing Methods: This ongoing pilot study examined the potential long-term effects in functional testing in fifteen women, who had been treated for breast cancer at an urban university hospital. Their ages were greater than 45 years, with a mean age of 57 plus or minus 2 years, two or more years after their last chemotherapy, and without signs and symptoms of recurrent breast cancer. Data Analysis: We compared results of their functional testing to results of the same testing obtained at baseline in an observational study of women without a diagnosis of breast cancer (n=91), age 53.6 years plus or minus 6 years. We examined the relationship of age to functional tests results for each test. Tests included time to (a) walk 6 meters, (b) rise from a chair and walk 3 meters, (c) open and close a panel of doors, (d) complete a simulated eating test, and (e) complete Trials A & B, as well as scores on the Benton Facial Recognition test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in Statistica. Findings and Implications: In each circumstance, the relationship between age and tests results favored the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions: Survivors of breast cancer may be expected to have normal life spans, however, the normal physiologic changes that occur with aging may be accelerated by the long-term effects of chemotherapy, resulting in decreased functioning, a loss of independence, and a decreased quality of life. Implications: Nurses can use this information to develop interventions that will mitigate or prevent loss of function and ultimately improve quality of life in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccelerated Loss in Functional Testing in Women Who Are Survivors of Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMahon, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCaiarelli, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Mahon, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; M. Caiarellien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165472-
dc.description.abstractAccelerated Loss in Functional Testing in Women Who Are Survivors of Breast Cancer Purpose: Of the 210,000 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer annually, more than 80% are expected to survive at least five years after treatment. Most will have a normal lifespan. Discovery of breast cancer represents an immediate threat to these women. In addition, aggressive therapies have great potential for both immediate and long-term side effects. Purpose: To determine if women who have undergone cytotoxic chemotherapy for breast cancer function less well on normative tests than women who have not undergone treatment with these agents. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Roy's Adaptation Model of Nursing Methods: This ongoing pilot study examined the potential long-term effects in functional testing in fifteen women, who had been treated for breast cancer at an urban university hospital. Their ages were greater than 45 years, with a mean age of 57 plus or minus 2 years, two or more years after their last chemotherapy, and without signs and symptoms of recurrent breast cancer. Data Analysis: We compared results of their functional testing to results of the same testing obtained at baseline in an observational study of women without a diagnosis of breast cancer (n=91), age 53.6 years plus or minus 6 years. We examined the relationship of age to functional tests results for each test. Tests included time to (a) walk 6 meters, (b) rise from a chair and walk 3 meters, (c) open and close a panel of doors, (d) complete a simulated eating test, and (e) complete Trials A &amp; B, as well as scores on the Benton Facial Recognition test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in Statistica. Findings and Implications: In each circumstance, the relationship between age and tests results favored the control group (p&lt;0.01). Conclusions: Survivors of breast cancer may be expected to have normal life spans, however, the normal physiologic changes that occur with aging may be accelerated by the long-term effects of chemotherapy, resulting in decreased functioning, a loss of independence, and a decreased quality of life. Implications: Nurses can use this information to develop interventions that will mitigate or prevent loss of function and ultimately improve quality of life in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:09Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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