A Randomized Clinical Trial to Test the Cope Intervention With Caregivers of Hospice Patients With Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165474
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Randomized Clinical Trial to Test the Cope Intervention With Caregivers of Hospice Patients With Cancer
Author(s):
McMillan, S.; Haley, W.; Weitzel, M.; Schonwetter, R.; Small, B.
Author Details:
S. McMillan, University of South Florida, College of Nursing, Tampa, Florida, USA; W. Haley; M. Weitzel; R. Schonwetter; B. Small
Abstract:
Caregivers of hospice patients with cancer provide essential support and experience considerable stress that can impact their quality of life. Purpose: The primary aim of this experimental study was to decrease stress and improve the quality of life of hospice caregivers by helping them to master the skills needed to better assess and manage problems experienced by cancer patients (pain, dyspnea, constipation), thus enhancing caregiver coping and self-appraisal of stressfulness of patient symptoms and quality of life for caregivers. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The study was based on the stress-process model. Methods: The sample of 239 patient/caregiver dyads was drawn from a large hospice and randomly divided into three groups: a control group receiving standard care (Group I); a group receiving standard care plus support visits (Group II); and a group receiving standard care plus the intervention (Group III). The intervention was based on the COPE method (Creativity, Optimism, Planning, Expert Information). Groups II and III received visits on the same schedule to control for the effects of researcher time and attention. On visit one, caregivers in Group III were taught to use the COPE method of managing patient problems, received a copy of the Home Care Guide for Advanced Cancer, and were taught how to assess patient symptom intensity. Visits two and three reinforced learning. Caregiver data included coping, self-appraisal of stress, and quality of life. Data were collected from all three groups on admission to the study, immediately post intervention (day 16), and four weeks after admission to the study (day 30). Data Analysis: Repeated measures mixed models was used. Findings and Implications: Analysis revealed a significant interaction between treatment group and time of testing for stressfulness of patient symptoms, but not for quality of life. For symptom stressfulness, the ratings from the control did not change over time, whereas the two intervention groups declined over the two follow-up points. Further, the decline was greater for the COPE intervention group. These results suggest that the hospice team might use both the supportive visits and the COPE intervention to help relieve the stress of caregiving; however, COPE might produce a greater decrease in the caregiver’s perceived stress. Further research into this issue is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Randomized Clinical Trial to Test the Cope Intervention With Caregivers of Hospice Patients With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaley, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeitzel, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchonwetter, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmall, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. McMillan, University of South Florida, College of Nursing, Tampa, Florida, USA; W. Haley; M. Weitzel; R. Schonwetter; B. Smallen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165474-
dc.description.abstractCaregivers of hospice patients with cancer provide essential support and experience considerable stress that can impact their quality of life. Purpose: The primary aim of this experimental study was to decrease stress and improve the quality of life of hospice caregivers by helping them to master the skills needed to better assess and manage problems experienced by cancer patients (pain, dyspnea, constipation), thus enhancing caregiver coping and self-appraisal of stressfulness of patient symptoms and quality of life for caregivers. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The study was based on the stress-process model. Methods: The sample of 239 patient/caregiver dyads was drawn from a large hospice and randomly divided into three groups: a control group receiving standard care (Group I); a group receiving standard care plus support visits (Group II); and a group receiving standard care plus the intervention (Group III). The intervention was based on the COPE method (Creativity, Optimism, Planning, Expert Information). Groups II and III received visits on the same schedule to control for the effects of researcher time and attention. On visit one, caregivers in Group III were taught to use the COPE method of managing patient problems, received a copy of the Home Care Guide for Advanced Cancer, and were taught how to assess patient symptom intensity. Visits two and three reinforced learning. Caregiver data included coping, self-appraisal of stress, and quality of life. Data were collected from all three groups on admission to the study, immediately post intervention (day 16), and four weeks after admission to the study (day 30). Data Analysis: Repeated measures mixed models was used. Findings and Implications: Analysis revealed a significant interaction between treatment group and time of testing for stressfulness of patient symptoms, but not for quality of life. For symptom stressfulness, the ratings from the control did not change over time, whereas the two intervention groups declined over the two follow-up points. Further, the decline was greater for the COPE intervention group. These results suggest that the hospice team might use both the supportive visits and the COPE intervention to help relieve the stress of caregiving; however, COPE might produce a greater decrease in the caregiver’s perceived stress. Further research into this issue is needed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:11Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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