Exploring the Mystery: Forming a Substantive Theory for Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in AIDS Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165476
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the Mystery: Forming a Substantive Theory for Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in AIDS Patients
Author(s):
Ownby, K.; Dune, L.
Author Details:
K. Ownby, University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston, SON, Houston, Texas, USA; L. Dune
Abstract:
This qualitative study using grounded theory, sought to explore the everyday life experiences related to peripheral neuropathy in person's with AIDS (PWA's). Current management strategies fail to achieve satisfactory pain relief in this particular patient population. A better understanding of the impact of neuropathic pain from the patient's perspective, can guide nurses to develop strategies and interventions to manage the pain and it's consequences. Purpose: A variety of peripheral neuropathies occur throughout the course of HIV infection, the most common peripheral nerve disorder of late HIV infection being distal sensory neuropathy (DSP). HIV-associated DSP affects up to one-third of patients with AIDS and commonly presents in the soles and dorsum of the feet. DSP causes a burning, tingling type of pain and is difficult to manage. This study was designed to explore the everyday life experiences related to DSP in PWA's and the behaviors they initiate to alleviate the pain. The specific aim of the study was to gather information so that nursing intervention protocols can be designed to reduce neuropathic pain. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach was used to better understand the impact of chronic neuropathic pain has on PWA's. Methods: Data was generated at a residential facility for PWA's. Tape-recorded, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 subjects. Transcriptions were compared to the types for their accuracy. Data Analysis: Data analysis began with verbatim transcriptions, followed by open coding, axial coding, and selective coding to identify core categories. Findings and Implications: Nineteen subjects were interviewed. The study sample included 12 males and 7 females with an average age of 41.6 years. The ethnicity of the subjects was 6 Caucasian, 11 African-American, and 2 Hispanic. The average CD4 lymphocyte count was 294. DSP pain is beyond consistent descriptions. Many interventions are attempted and are ineffective; however, the interventions that work are highly individualized. The emerging categories included working with the pain, explaining the pain, living with the pain, interpreting the pain, and coping with the pain.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the Mystery: Forming a Substantive Theory for Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in AIDS Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwnby, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDune, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsK. Ownby, University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston, SON, Houston, Texas, USA; L. Duneen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165476-
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study using grounded theory, sought to explore the everyday life experiences related to peripheral neuropathy in person's with AIDS (PWA's). Current management strategies fail to achieve satisfactory pain relief in this particular patient population. A better understanding of the impact of neuropathic pain from the patient's perspective, can guide nurses to develop strategies and interventions to manage the pain and it's consequences. Purpose: A variety of peripheral neuropathies occur throughout the course of HIV infection, the most common peripheral nerve disorder of late HIV infection being distal sensory neuropathy (DSP). HIV-associated DSP affects up to one-third of patients with AIDS and commonly presents in the soles and dorsum of the feet. DSP causes a burning, tingling type of pain and is difficult to manage. This study was designed to explore the everyday life experiences related to DSP in PWA's and the behaviors they initiate to alleviate the pain. The specific aim of the study was to gather information so that nursing intervention protocols can be designed to reduce neuropathic pain. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach was used to better understand the impact of chronic neuropathic pain has on PWA's. Methods: Data was generated at a residential facility for PWA's. Tape-recorded, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 subjects. Transcriptions were compared to the types for their accuracy. Data Analysis: Data analysis began with verbatim transcriptions, followed by open coding, axial coding, and selective coding to identify core categories. Findings and Implications: Nineteen subjects were interviewed. The study sample included 12 males and 7 females with an average age of 41.6 years. The ethnicity of the subjects was 6 Caucasian, 11 African-American, and 2 Hispanic. The average CD4 lymphocyte count was 294. DSP pain is beyond consistent descriptions. Many interventions are attempted and are ineffective; however, the interventions that work are highly individualized. The emerging categories included working with the pain, explaining the pain, living with the pain, interpreting the pain, and coping with the pain.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:14Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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