An Exploratory Study on Nurses' Perception of Spirituality and Spiritual Care From a Multicultural Context

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165478
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploratory Study on Nurses' Perception of Spirituality and Spiritual Care From a Multicultural Context
Author(s):
Ping, L.; Hoon, T.; Ang, E.
Author Details:
L. Ping, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital, Singapore; T. Hoon; E. Ang
Abstract:
In recent years, the propagation of holistic nursing care has been fast moving, and it encompasses bio-psycho-social-spiritual dimension of patient care. Purpose: However, spiritual aspect of care has been given very little attention. This could jeopardize patient’s quality of life as spiritual well being of an individual can exert a great influence over the other aspect such as patients’ physical and mental well being. Thus, nursing as a caring professional should strike a harmony and balance of mind, body and spirit in maintaining health especially for cancer patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study is to describe nurses’ from multicultural definition of spirituality, as well as explore how nurses identify and response to patients’ spiritual needs. Methods: The study sample include 11 registered nurses from multicultural background who had been working in an in–patient hematology-oncology ward from a period ranging from 1 month to 10 years. Verbal consent was obtained from the nurses’ prior the study. Confidentiality and anonymity of the nurses were maintained throughout the study. Data Analysis: Critical incidents were used to assess how nurses’ identify and respond to patients’ spiritual needs. The data were transcribed and subjected to content analysis where categories were then developed and described. The final themes that emerged from the study were subjected to peer reviews. Findings and Implications: Findings suggested that nurses perception of spirituality is associated with self-belief, relationship with others and God. In the course of nursing care, nurses recognize patients’ spiritual needs when: the patients initiate religious conversation, practices and carry religious items; when patients were informed of their cancer diagnosis or were listed under terminally ill list; or when patients manifest negative behaviors. In meeting patients’ spiritual needs, the nurses were personally involved in addressing patients’ spiritual needs and refer patients to others if they could not provide such care. Thus, nursing as a caring professional should strike a harmony and balance of mind, body and spirit in maintaining health especially for cancer patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploratory Study on Nurses' Perception of Spirituality and Spiritual Care From a Multicultural Contexten_GB
dc.contributor.authorPing, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoon, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAng, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Ping, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital, Singapore; T. Hoon; E. Angen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165478-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, the propagation of holistic nursing care has been fast moving, and it encompasses bio-psycho-social-spiritual dimension of patient care. Purpose: However, spiritual aspect of care has been given very little attention. This could jeopardize patient’s quality of life as spiritual well being of an individual can exert a great influence over the other aspect such as patients’ physical and mental well being. Thus, nursing as a caring professional should strike a harmony and balance of mind, body and spirit in maintaining health especially for cancer patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study is to describe nurses’ from multicultural definition of spirituality, as well as explore how nurses identify and response to patients’ spiritual needs. Methods: The study sample include 11 registered nurses from multicultural background who had been working in an in–patient hematology-oncology ward from a period ranging from 1 month to 10 years. Verbal consent was obtained from the nurses’ prior the study. Confidentiality and anonymity of the nurses were maintained throughout the study. Data Analysis: Critical incidents were used to assess how nurses’ identify and respond to patients’ spiritual needs. The data were transcribed and subjected to content analysis where categories were then developed and described. The final themes that emerged from the study were subjected to peer reviews. Findings and Implications: Findings suggested that nurses perception of spirituality is associated with self-belief, relationship with others and God. In the course of nursing care, nurses recognize patients’ spiritual needs when: the patients initiate religious conversation, practices and carry religious items; when patients were informed of their cancer diagnosis or were listed under terminally ill list; or when patients manifest negative behaviors. In meeting patients’ spiritual needs, the nurses were personally involved in addressing patients’ spiritual needs and refer patients to others if they could not provide such care. Thus, nursing as a caring professional should strike a harmony and balance of mind, body and spirit in maintaining health especially for cancer patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:16Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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