Comparison of Health Status and Quality of Life of Women With Lung Cancer and Their Family Members

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165479
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Health Status and Quality of Life of Women With Lung Cancer and Their Family Members
Author(s):
Sarn, L.; Brown, J.; Cooley, M.; Padilla, G.; Chernecky, C.; Danao, L.
Author Details:
L. Sarn, UCLA SON, Los Angeles, California, USA; J. Brown; M. Cooley; G. Padilla; C. Chernecky; L. Danao
Abstract:
In 2003, over 80,000 American families will experience lung cancer in a female family member; yet, no studies have described the health status and quality of life (QOL) of family members, information important for supportive nursing care. Purpose: The purposes of this descriptive study were to describe and compare the health status and QOL of women with non-small cell lung cancer and their family members; and to examine demographic and clinical characteristics associated with poorer QOL among family members. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A QOL framework was used to explore the relationships of health status and QOL of these dyads. Methods: The study sample included 51 dyads. The women with NSCLC (18% with metastasis, average time since diagnosis 22 months), who were participants in a larger prospective study, identified family members for participation: (92% spouses and mean age of 59 years). Telephone interviews were used to measure demographic variables. Well established, reliable, and valid measures of health status [Index of chronic conditions, depressed mood as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, (CES-D), and tobacco use], and QOL (Short Form-36) were used. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed with frequency distributions, chi square, paired t-tests, and correlations. Findings and Implications: 41% of family members had chronic conditions; 16% had > 2 conditions (22% had a previous heart attack). The number of comorbid conditions was not significantly related to QOL; those who had a heart attack had significantly lower QOL. QOL scores varied widely. Scores of family members were significantly better than the women with lung cancer; and they were less likely to have depressed mood (CES-D>16) (14% vs. 41%). Family members were less likely to be former smokers (49% vs. 78%) and more likely to smoke (18% vs. 4 %) than women with lung cancer. Poorer physical QOL was associated with being older, greater number of comorbid conditions, and less education. Non-spouses, younger family members, and those with depressed mood had poorer emotional QOL. Findings support the importance of nursing assessment of health status and tobacco use of family members. Further prospective studies are needed that test strategies to support QOL of family members of women with lung cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Health Status and Quality of Life of Women With Lung Cancer and Their Family Membersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSarn, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCooley, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPadilla, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChernecky, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDanao, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Sarn, UCLA SON, Los Angeles, California, USA; J. Brown; M. Cooley; G. Padilla; C. Chernecky; L. Danaoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165479-
dc.description.abstractIn 2003, over 80,000 American families will experience lung cancer in a female family member; yet, no studies have described the health status and quality of life (QOL) of family members, information important for supportive nursing care. Purpose: The purposes of this descriptive study were to describe and compare the health status and QOL of women with non-small cell lung cancer and their family members; and to examine demographic and clinical characteristics associated with poorer QOL among family members. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A QOL framework was used to explore the relationships of health status and QOL of these dyads. Methods: The study sample included 51 dyads. The women with NSCLC (18% with metastasis, average time since diagnosis 22 months), who were participants in a larger prospective study, identified family members for participation: (92% spouses and mean age of 59 years). Telephone interviews were used to measure demographic variables. Well established, reliable, and valid measures of health status [Index of chronic conditions, depressed mood as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, (CES-D), and tobacco use], and QOL (Short Form-36) were used. Data Analysis: Data were analyzed with frequency distributions, chi square, paired t-tests, and correlations. Findings and Implications: 41% of family members had chronic conditions; 16% had > 2 conditions (22% had a previous heart attack). The number of comorbid conditions was not significantly related to QOL; those who had a heart attack had significantly lower QOL. QOL scores varied widely. Scores of family members were significantly better than the women with lung cancer; and they were less likely to have depressed mood (CES-D>16) (14% vs. 41%). Family members were less likely to be former smokers (49% vs. 78%) and more likely to smoke (18% vs. 4 %) than women with lung cancer. Poorer physical QOL was associated with being older, greater number of comorbid conditions, and less education. Non-spouses, younger family members, and those with depressed mood had poorer emotional QOL. Findings support the importance of nursing assessment of health status and tobacco use of family members. Further prospective studies are needed that test strategies to support QOL of family members of women with lung cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:17Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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