2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165480
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neuro-Oncology Caregivers: Correlates of Distress
Author(s):
Sherwood, P.; Given, B.; Given, C.; Schiffman, R.; Murman, D.; Lovely, M.
Author Details:
P. Sherwood, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; B. Given; C. Given; R. Schiffman; D. Murman; M. Lovely
Abstract:
Improving the emotional health of caregivers of persons with a primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT). Purpose: Caregivers of cancer and dementia patients are at risk for increased mortality, depression, and anxiety. However, there have been minimal efforts to describe the impact of providing care for persons with both oncological and neurological sequelae. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of patient functional, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric (NP) status and caregiver mastery and perceived adequacy of information to care (PAIC) on burden and depression of caregivers of persons with a PMBT. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Based on Lazarus’ Theory of Stress and Coping, the patient’s functional, cognitive, and NP status dictate care demands during the primary appraisal that are met using resources identified during the secondary appraisal (mastery and PAIC). Caregivers’ stress response is operationalized as caregiver burden and depression. Methods: The cross-sectional, descriptive study consisted of telephone interviews with 95 adult caregivers of persons with a PMBT recruited from two national brain tumor support groups, two urban cancer centers, and a statewide cancer registry. The 45-60 minute interview consisted of sociodemographic questions and the following instruments: ADL/IADL scale (á=.93); Cognitive Performance Scale (á=.71); Neuropsychiatric Inventory (á=.78); Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (á=.96); Caregiver Mastery (á=.73); Caregiver Reaction Assessment (subscales: self esteem á =.79, abandonment á =.83, finances á =.87, schedule á =.75, health á =.70); and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (á=.89). Data Analysis: Using structural equation modeling, relationships were formulated among variables, model fit was assessed, and respecification was done as necessary to interpret the relationships. Findings and Implications: The overall model demonstrated good fit indices (rmsea=.05, ÷2=11.6 p=.24, gfi=.93) Patients’ NP status and caregiver mastery predicted caregiver depression and portions of caregiver burden (self esteem, finances, and schedule). Patients’ NP status also predicted other portions of caregiver burden (abandonment and health). Oncology nurses should target interventions for improving caregiver health at assisting caregivers to manage and deal with patients’ NP symptoms. Because oncology nurses are largely responsible for teaching and monitoring caregiver skills and knowledge, nurses are in a prime position to assist caregivers to increase mastery, thereby affecting caregiver, and ultimately patient, outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeuro-Oncology Caregivers: Correlates of Distressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSherwood, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchiffman, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurman, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLovely, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsP. Sherwood, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; B. Given; C. Given; R. Schiffman; D. Murman; M. Lovelyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165480-
dc.description.abstractImproving the emotional health of caregivers of persons with a primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT). Purpose: Caregivers of cancer and dementia patients are at risk for increased mortality, depression, and anxiety. However, there have been minimal efforts to describe the impact of providing care for persons with both oncological and neurological sequelae. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of patient functional, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric (NP) status and caregiver mastery and perceived adequacy of information to care (PAIC) on burden and depression of caregivers of persons with a PMBT. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Based on Lazarus’ Theory of Stress and Coping, the patient’s functional, cognitive, and NP status dictate care demands during the primary appraisal that are met using resources identified during the secondary appraisal (mastery and PAIC). Caregivers’ stress response is operationalized as caregiver burden and depression. Methods: The cross-sectional, descriptive study consisted of telephone interviews with 95 adult caregivers of persons with a PMBT recruited from two national brain tumor support groups, two urban cancer centers, and a statewide cancer registry. The 45-60 minute interview consisted of sociodemographic questions and the following instruments: ADL/IADL scale (á=.93); Cognitive Performance Scale (á=.71); Neuropsychiatric Inventory (á=.78); Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (á=.96); Caregiver Mastery (á=.73); Caregiver Reaction Assessment (subscales: self esteem á =.79, abandonment á =.83, finances á =.87, schedule á =.75, health á =.70); and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (á=.89). Data Analysis: Using structural equation modeling, relationships were formulated among variables, model fit was assessed, and respecification was done as necessary to interpret the relationships. Findings and Implications: The overall model demonstrated good fit indices (rmsea=.05, ÷2=11.6 p=.24, gfi=.93) Patients’ NP status and caregiver mastery predicted caregiver depression and portions of caregiver burden (self esteem, finances, and schedule). Patients’ NP status also predicted other portions of caregiver burden (abandonment and health). Oncology nurses should target interventions for improving caregiver health at assisting caregivers to manage and deal with patients’ NP symptoms. Because oncology nurses are largely responsible for teaching and monitoring caregiver skills and knowledge, nurses are in a prime position to assist caregivers to increase mastery, thereby affecting caregiver, and ultimately patient, outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:18Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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