Detaching Her from Her Social Roles: Korean Immigrant Women's Perceptions of Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165482
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Detaching Her from Her Social Roles: Korean Immigrant Women's Perceptions of Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Suh, E.; Kagan, S.
Author Details:
E. Suh, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; S. Kagan
Abstract:
Individual's perceptions about breast cancer are reported affecting attitudes toward the screening modalities. Given the low rates of breast cancer screening among KIW, understanding their perspectives is imperative to decipher their sociocultural barriers to breast cancer screening. Korean immigrants are among the fastest growing Asian populations in the U.S. Women in this population are not exempted from the threat of breast cancer, which is the most common female cancer in the U.S. To date, perceptions about breast cancer have not been investigated from the perspectives of Korean immigrant women (KIW). Thus, this study was aimed to explore and interpret KIW’s perceptions of breast cancer using a naturalistic inquiry. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Symbolic interactionism, the meta-concept of cultural competence, and Korean womanhood provided theoretical underpinnings of this study. Methods: The grounded theory methodology was used. Twenty KIW were conveniently selected through a community church in an East coastal city. They participated a set of two consecutive interviews conducted in Korean. The participants consisted of various age groups from 20 to 81, the years of residency in the U.S. from two to 36, and diverse levels of education, marital status, as well as, immigration status. Data Analysis: Constant comparison technique was used in qualitative data analysis. Open-coding, axial coding, and the selective coding were conducted. The trustworthiness of the findings was examined via Lincoln and Guba’s evaluation criteria. Findings and Implications: The core concept of breast cancer is detaching her from her social roles. The participants perceived breast cancer as both relational and social detachment through an image of cutting off a breast. Predetermination, forbearance of Han (heartburning), and resistance to Sun-Li (universal principles) were identified as the predominant causal factors of breast cancer, which were influenced by Confucian thoughts and traditional Korean health beliefs. The strategies addressed for preventing breast cancer provided a consistent feature with other Asian ways of maintaining health such as, balancing in mind and body, or not talking and thinking about breast cancer. The findings illustrated that KIW’s perceptions of breast cancer are profoundly influenced by their traditional and sociocultural contexts. Researchers and clinicians would benefit from the findings to expand their understandings of KIW and guide KIW to the screening practices.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetaching Her from Her Social Roles: Korean Immigrant Women's Perceptions of Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSuh, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKagan, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsE. Suh, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; S. Kaganen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165482-
dc.description.abstractIndividual's perceptions about breast cancer are reported affecting attitudes toward the screening modalities. Given the low rates of breast cancer screening among KIW, understanding their perspectives is imperative to decipher their sociocultural barriers to breast cancer screening. Korean immigrants are among the fastest growing Asian populations in the U.S. Women in this population are not exempted from the threat of breast cancer, which is the most common female cancer in the U.S. To date, perceptions about breast cancer have not been investigated from the perspectives of Korean immigrant women (KIW). Thus, this study was aimed to explore and interpret KIW’s perceptions of breast cancer using a naturalistic inquiry. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Symbolic interactionism, the meta-concept of cultural competence, and Korean womanhood provided theoretical underpinnings of this study. Methods: The grounded theory methodology was used. Twenty KIW were conveniently selected through a community church in an East coastal city. They participated a set of two consecutive interviews conducted in Korean. The participants consisted of various age groups from 20 to 81, the years of residency in the U.S. from two to 36, and diverse levels of education, marital status, as well as, immigration status. Data Analysis: Constant comparison technique was used in qualitative data analysis. Open-coding, axial coding, and the selective coding were conducted. The trustworthiness of the findings was examined via Lincoln and Guba’s evaluation criteria. Findings and Implications: The core concept of breast cancer is detaching her from her social roles. The participants perceived breast cancer as both relational and social detachment through an image of cutting off a breast. Predetermination, forbearance of Han (heartburning), and resistance to Sun-Li (universal principles) were identified as the predominant causal factors of breast cancer, which were influenced by Confucian thoughts and traditional Korean health beliefs. The strategies addressed for preventing breast cancer provided a consistent feature with other Asian ways of maintaining health such as, balancing in mind and body, or not talking and thinking about breast cancer. The findings illustrated that KIW’s perceptions of breast cancer are profoundly influenced by their traditional and sociocultural contexts. Researchers and clinicians would benefit from the findings to expand their understandings of KIW and guide KIW to the screening practices.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:20Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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