A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words: Using Pictograms to Assist Oncology Patients With Pain Assessment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165483
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words: Using Pictograms to Assist Oncology Patients With Pain Assessment
Author(s):
Swisher, M.; Nesbit, S.; Smolinski, K.
Author Details:
M. Swisher, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; S. Nesbit; K. Smolinski
Abstract:
It is estimated that 30-50% of patients undergoing oncologic treatment and 70-90% of patients with advanced cancer experience significant pain. Barriers to effective pain management include lack of knowledge and various attitudes of patients regarding pain management. Pain is a subjective experience for patients, therefore they are the most reliable source to describe and rate their pain. Purpose: In order to assist patients in effectively communicating their pain to the multidisciplinary team, increased efforts by nursing and other disciplines are needed to increase patient knowledge about cancer pain assessment. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, a 0-10 scale is used to measure a "Daily 24-hour average pain rating" (APR24). This was initiated as a pain-screening tool in an effort to capture the patient's global pain experience on a given day and facilitate pain management. However, patients have reported difficulties with providing an APR24. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Based on Paivio's "Dual Coding Theory", pictograms are being used to reinforce imagery, which plays an important role in cognitive operations. Methods: A study was designed to determine if focused pain rating education would improve the patient's understanding and ability to answer the 24-hour pain question. The study uses an experimental design with convenience sampling and is ongoing to examine the effect of a one-time structured patient education session focusing on the APR24. Oncology in-patients (n=100) with a current complaint of cancer pain are identified, consented, enrolled, and randomized to a treatment or control group. The treatment group receives a one-time pain rating education session and the control group receives standard in-patient pain education. The intervention includes discussion of three pictograms focusing on the idea of averaging their pain over 24 hours. A multidisciplinary team from the oncology pain team developed the pictograms and pre/post questionnaire to measure the patient's comfort and skill in rating their pain. The questionnaire has content validity and will be evaluated for reliability in this study. Data Analysis: Upon completion of the data collection, groups will be compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Findings and Implications: Study results will be evaluated for implications and integration into patient care and education.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Picture is Worth A Thousand Words: Using Pictograms to Assist Oncology Patients With Pain Assessmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwisher, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNesbit, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmolinski, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Swisher, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; S. Nesbit; K. Smolinskien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165483-
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that 30-50% of patients undergoing oncologic treatment and 70-90% of patients with advanced cancer experience significant pain. Barriers to effective pain management include lack of knowledge and various attitudes of patients regarding pain management. Pain is a subjective experience for patients, therefore they are the most reliable source to describe and rate their pain. Purpose: In order to assist patients in effectively communicating their pain to the multidisciplinary team, increased efforts by nursing and other disciplines are needed to increase patient knowledge about cancer pain assessment. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, a 0-10 scale is used to measure a "Daily 24-hour average pain rating" (APR24). This was initiated as a pain-screening tool in an effort to capture the patient's global pain experience on a given day and facilitate pain management. However, patients have reported difficulties with providing an APR24. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Based on Paivio's "Dual Coding Theory", pictograms are being used to reinforce imagery, which plays an important role in cognitive operations. Methods: A study was designed to determine if focused pain rating education would improve the patient's understanding and ability to answer the 24-hour pain question. The study uses an experimental design with convenience sampling and is ongoing to examine the effect of a one-time structured patient education session focusing on the APR24. Oncology in-patients (n=100) with a current complaint of cancer pain are identified, consented, enrolled, and randomized to a treatment or control group. The treatment group receives a one-time pain rating education session and the control group receives standard in-patient pain education. The intervention includes discussion of three pictograms focusing on the idea of averaging their pain over 24 hours. A multidisciplinary team from the oncology pain team developed the pictograms and pre/post questionnaire to measure the patient's comfort and skill in rating their pain. The questionnaire has content validity and will be evaluated for reliability in this study. Data Analysis: Upon completion of the data collection, groups will be compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Findings and Implications: Study results will be evaluated for implications and integration into patient care and education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:21Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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