Descriptive Study of Breast Cancer Patients' Patterns of Use and Satisfaction With the Internet-Based Information and Support Program Chess (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165487
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Descriptive Study of Breast Cancer Patients' Patterns of Use and Satisfaction With the Internet-Based Information and Support Program Chess (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System)
Author(s):
Ward, D.; Staff, I.; Ford, J.; Salner, A.
Author Details:
D. Ward, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, USA; I. Staff; J. Ford; A. Salner
Abstract:
To explore breast cancer patients’ use of and satisfaction with CHESS, an e-health system providing information, decision-making tools and support, and how that use is affected by demographic and disease characteristics. Purpose: To increase oncology nurses’ understanding of an on-line resource for breast cancer patients and to identify ways that nurses can guide patients throughout their disease continuum. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A growing body of research indicates that information combined with emotional and social support plays a key role in helping patients cope and can lead to more accurate expectations, improved physical health and even survival rates. Methods: 129 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients were enrolled for nine months. Verbal consent, demographic and disease/treatment data were collected at enrollment. Initial usage date, login, and page totals were collected from CHESS web site as outcome measures. Satisfaction was collected monthly. Age, experience with computers, education, stage of disease, time since diagnosis, and treatment modality defined subgroups for analysis. Data Analysis: Page preferences (information, support, analysis) were calculated from usage statistics. Analysis of variance and chi-square statistics were used to explore group differences. Satisfaction was correlated with usage measures. Findings and Implications: There were clear individual differences: 34% began CHESS immediately but 7% waited months; 44% used for only one month, 32% for more than 3 months; monthly logins ranged up to 120 per month; total pages ranged from 2 to 15,000; intensity increased through six months. Support pages were most frequently requested. Page preference, established during first month, remained constant. Women who preferred support features had significantly greater logins and longer duration. Those with greater computer familiarity or enrollment soon after diagnosis requested more information pages. Mastectomy or chemotherapy patients were more likely to prefer support pages. Greater satisfaction was correlated with higher usage. Satisfaction with support and decision-making correlated with participant use of these types of pages. Implications: Patients can benefit from e-health resources like CHESS for both information and support. Patients may derive greater benefit from “coaching” in use and comfort with the technology. Nurses can direct patients to specific areas, meeting individual needs. Nurses can also monitor usage to keep recommendations relevant and to suggest additional resources.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDescriptive Study of Breast Cancer Patients' Patterns of Use and Satisfaction With the Internet-Based Information and Support Program Chess (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWard, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStaff, I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFord, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSalner, A.en_US
dc.author.detailsD. Ward, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, USA; I. Staff; J. Ford; A. Salneren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165487-
dc.description.abstractTo explore breast cancer patients’ use of and satisfaction with CHESS, an e-health system providing information, decision-making tools and support, and how that use is affected by demographic and disease characteristics. Purpose: To increase oncology nurses’ understanding of an on-line resource for breast cancer patients and to identify ways that nurses can guide patients throughout their disease continuum. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A growing body of research indicates that information combined with emotional and social support plays a key role in helping patients cope and can lead to more accurate expectations, improved physical health and even survival rates. Methods: 129 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients were enrolled for nine months. Verbal consent, demographic and disease/treatment data were collected at enrollment. Initial usage date, login, and page totals were collected from CHESS web site as outcome measures. Satisfaction was collected monthly. Age, experience with computers, education, stage of disease, time since diagnosis, and treatment modality defined subgroups for analysis. Data Analysis: Page preferences (information, support, analysis) were calculated from usage statistics. Analysis of variance and chi-square statistics were used to explore group differences. Satisfaction was correlated with usage measures. Findings and Implications: There were clear individual differences: 34% began CHESS immediately but 7% waited months; 44% used for only one month, 32% for more than 3 months; monthly logins ranged up to 120 per month; total pages ranged from 2 to 15,000; intensity increased through six months. Support pages were most frequently requested. Page preference, established during first month, remained constant. Women who preferred support features had significantly greater logins and longer duration. Those with greater computer familiarity or enrollment soon after diagnosis requested more information pages. Mastectomy or chemotherapy patients were more likely to prefer support pages. Greater satisfaction was correlated with higher usage. Satisfaction with support and decision-making correlated with participant use of these types of pages. Implications: Patients can benefit from e-health resources like CHESS for both information and support. Patients may derive greater benefit from “coaching” in use and comfort with the technology. Nurses can direct patients to specific areas, meeting individual needs. Nurses can also monitor usage to keep recommendations relevant and to suggest additional resources.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:25Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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