Preserving Subjective Meaning in Developing an Instrument to Measure Cancer-Related Fatigue

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165488
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preserving Subjective Meaning in Developing an Instrument to Measure Cancer-Related Fatigue
Author(s):
Wu, H.; McSweeney, M.
Author Details:
H. Wu, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; M. McSweeney
Abstract:
Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a pervasive subjective experience that can affect all aspects of a person’s life. Assessment of CRF is the key to recognizing and managing this distressing symptom. Fatigue instruments have usually been generated from an investigator’s observations, rather than from actual experience described by patients. The literature has shown that patients and health care providers often perceive CRF symptoms differently. Purpose: The present multi-phase study aimed to combine qualitative and quantitative approaches to develop a specific measure of CRF from the patients’ perspective and to preserve subjective meaning in the instrument development process. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The subjective manifestations/dimensions of fatigue in Piper’s Integrated Fatigue Model served as the study’s conceptual framework. The model’s underlying premise that subjective indicators are essential to assessing the fatigue experience was used to guide the study. Methods: The study took place at a freestanding cancer clinic in St. Louis, Missouri. A sample of nine breast cancer and one large cell Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy participated in the qualitative item generation. Twenty cancer patients who had experienced CRF content validated the draft instrument. Thirty breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy pilot tested the content validated instrument. Forty-two items were generated from ten semi-structured individual interviews and six daily fatigue diaries This draft 42-item instrument was revised based on content evaluation by two panels of cancer patient content experts. The 30 content validated items were pilot tested using cognitive interview techniques. Data Analysis: An instrument with 16 items measuring CRF on a 5-point rating scale with 5, very much, to 1, not at all, was developed. Findings and Implications: This newly developed instrument was specifically designed to measure subjective CRF symptoms as described and validated by cancer patients It is unique in reflecting the patients’ experience and distinguishing the manifestations of CRF from its causes and consequences. The preliminary psychometric properties of this instrument, tested with a new sample of 82 cancer patients, are promising. When more comprehensive psychometric testing has been completed, it is likely that this instrument will allow health care providers to acknowledge and better understand what their cancer patients are experiencing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreserving Subjective Meaning in Developing an Instrument to Measure Cancer-Related Fatigueen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWu, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcSweeney, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsH. Wu, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; M. McSweeneyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165488-
dc.description.abstractCancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a pervasive subjective experience that can affect all aspects of a person’s life. Assessment of CRF is the key to recognizing and managing this distressing symptom. Fatigue instruments have usually been generated from an investigator’s observations, rather than from actual experience described by patients. The literature has shown that patients and health care providers often perceive CRF symptoms differently. Purpose: The present multi-phase study aimed to combine qualitative and quantitative approaches to develop a specific measure of CRF from the patients’ perspective and to preserve subjective meaning in the instrument development process. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The subjective manifestations/dimensions of fatigue in Piper’s Integrated Fatigue Model served as the study’s conceptual framework. The model’s underlying premise that subjective indicators are essential to assessing the fatigue experience was used to guide the study. Methods: The study took place at a freestanding cancer clinic in St. Louis, Missouri. A sample of nine breast cancer and one large cell Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy participated in the qualitative item generation. Twenty cancer patients who had experienced CRF content validated the draft instrument. Thirty breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy pilot tested the content validated instrument. Forty-two items were generated from ten semi-structured individual interviews and six daily fatigue diaries This draft 42-item instrument was revised based on content evaluation by two panels of cancer patient content experts. The 30 content validated items were pilot tested using cognitive interview techniques. Data Analysis: An instrument with 16 items measuring CRF on a 5-point rating scale with 5, very much, to 1, not at all, was developed. Findings and Implications: This newly developed instrument was specifically designed to measure subjective CRF symptoms as described and validated by cancer patients It is unique in reflecting the patients’ experience and distinguishing the manifestations of CRF from its causes and consequences. The preliminary psychometric properties of this instrument, tested with a new sample of 82 cancer patients, are promising. When more comprehensive psychometric testing has been completed, it is likely that this instrument will allow health care providers to acknowledge and better understand what their cancer patients are experiencing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:26Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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