2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165489
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Functional Status of Cancer Patients Using Hospice
Author(s):
Xue, Y.
Author Details:
Y. Xue, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Abstract:
Patient evaluation is nurses’ regular work and is the basis to implement effective care. Providing adequate care to patients will improve their quality of lives. Purpose: The goal of hospice care is to improve the quality of a patient's last days by offering comfort and dignity. Physical functional status is one aspect of quality of life. Cancer patients are the majority of hospice patients. Study indicated that advanced cancer patients in good physical condition had a high self-efficacy and therefore had less emotionally distress. However, there is lack of overall information of physical functional status among cancer patients using hospice. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of physical functional status among cancer patients using hospice, to determine whether there is difference in functional status across cancer diagnosis, and to further identify the relationship between physical functional status and services provided. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Literature suggests that better services will improve patients’ functional status and therefore improve their quality of lives. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study design. The sample is from the 2000 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (Revised in 2003), including patients with cancer diagnosis and using hospice. Physical functional status is measured by activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, which are well established and have been widely recognized. Data Analysis: SUDAAN, the software that, is specifically designed for analysis of cluster-correlated data from multi-stage sample survey design, will be used to analyze the data for this study. Univariate analysis, One-way ANOVA, post hoc analysis, and multivariate analysis will be conducted to answer questions. Findings and Implications: This study is in progress. The expected findings will have great implications for hospice practice for cancer patients. It would provide information that can be utilized to improve patient function and quality of life. In addition, the findings of relationship between patient physical function status and services provided by healthcare providers will help to discover the deficiencies in current care for dying cancer patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFunctional Status of Cancer Patients Using Hospiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorXue, Y.en_US
dc.author.detailsY. Xue, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165489-
dc.description.abstractPatient evaluation is nurses’ regular work and is the basis to implement effective care. Providing adequate care to patients will improve their quality of lives. Purpose: The goal of hospice care is to improve the quality of a patient's last days by offering comfort and dignity. Physical functional status is one aspect of quality of life. Cancer patients are the majority of hospice patients. Study indicated that advanced cancer patients in good physical condition had a high self-efficacy and therefore had less emotionally distress. However, there is lack of overall information of physical functional status among cancer patients using hospice. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of physical functional status among cancer patients using hospice, to determine whether there is difference in functional status across cancer diagnosis, and to further identify the relationship between physical functional status and services provided. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Literature suggests that better services will improve patients’ functional status and therefore improve their quality of lives. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study design. The sample is from the 2000 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (Revised in 2003), including patients with cancer diagnosis and using hospice. Physical functional status is measured by activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, which are well established and have been widely recognized. Data Analysis: SUDAAN, the software that, is specifically designed for analysis of cluster-correlated data from multi-stage sample survey design, will be used to analyze the data for this study. Univariate analysis, One-way ANOVA, post hoc analysis, and multivariate analysis will be conducted to answer questions. Findings and Implications: This study is in progress. The expected findings will have great implications for hospice practice for cancer patients. It would provide information that can be utilized to improve patient function and quality of life. In addition, the findings of relationship between patient physical function status and services provided by healthcare providers will help to discover the deficiencies in current care for dying cancer patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:27Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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