A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Educational Intervention for Managing Fatigue in Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165490
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Educational Intervention for Managing Fatigue in Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Yates, P.; Aranda, S.; Hargraves, M.; McLaughlan, S.; Mirolo, B.; Milne, D.
Author Details:
P. Yates, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia; S. Aranda; M. Hargraves; S. McLaughlan; B. Mirolo; D. Milne
Abstract:
Effective patient education is integral to cancer symptom management, yet there is limited evidence to guide design of specific educational strategies. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a nurse-administered educational intervention for women with breast cancer in improving: confidence with managing fatigue; fatigue intensity; and quality of life. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Piper’s integrated fatigue model and Greene’s PRECEDE model of health promotion were used to develop specific educational content and strategies. Methods: A randomized-controlled trial with a consecutively recruited sample of 108 women commencing adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage 1 or 2 breast cancer was conducted. Women completed a self-report survey at first treatment visit, prior to randomization. The intervention group received a one-to-one fatigue education program delivered over three 10-20 minute sessions one week apart. The first session (delivered at second treatment visit) involved face-to-face instruction, while two follow-up sessions were delivered by phone. Participants completed follow-up surveys at three subsequent treatment visits. Measures included: two 11-point numeric rating scales assessing confidence with managing fatigue; 11-point numeric rating scales measuring fatigue at worst, average, and best; FACT-F and Piper Fatigue Scales, EORTC QLQ-C30 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. All scales had alpha reliabilities greater than 0.7. Data Analysis: Separate analyses of covariance of change scores for each outcome variable between baseline and three follow-up time points were conducted, controlling for the variable’s corresponding baseline value. Findings and Implications: Mean fatigue scores for both groups increased over time, however the mean baseline-immediate post-intervention increase was significantly greater for the control group for worst (p<.01) and average fatigue (p<.02), and FACT (p<.04) and Piper Fatigue scores (p<.01). Mean impact of fatigue on social activities, sexual activities and enjoyable activities was greater for the control group (p<.03, p<.01, p<.02 respectively for baseline-immediate post-intervention change scores). These differences were not significant for follow-up assessments. No significant differences in pre-post intervention change scores were identified for confidence with managing fatigue, anxiety, depression, or quality of life (p>.05). Findings suggest educational interventions have potential for assisting women to cope with cancer-related fatigue and its effects, however further research is needed to identify ways to improve the extent and sustainability of such effects.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Randomized Controlled Trial of an Educational Intervention for Managing Fatigue in Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Stage Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorYates, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAranda, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHargraves, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcLaughlan, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMirolo, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMilne, D.en_US
dc.author.detailsP. Yates, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia; S. Aranda; M. Hargraves; S. McLaughlan; B. Mirolo; D. Milneen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165490-
dc.description.abstractEffective patient education is integral to cancer symptom management, yet there is limited evidence to guide design of specific educational strategies. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a nurse-administered educational intervention for women with breast cancer in improving: confidence with managing fatigue; fatigue intensity; and quality of life. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Piper&rsquo;s integrated fatigue model and Greene&rsquo;s PRECEDE model of health promotion were used to develop specific educational content and strategies. Methods: A randomized-controlled trial with a consecutively recruited sample of 108 women commencing adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage 1 or 2 breast cancer was conducted. Women completed a self-report survey at first treatment visit, prior to randomization. The intervention group received a one-to-one fatigue education program delivered over three 10-20 minute sessions one week apart. The first session (delivered at second treatment visit) involved face-to-face instruction, while two follow-up sessions were delivered by phone. Participants completed follow-up surveys at three subsequent treatment visits. Measures included: two 11-point numeric rating scales assessing confidence with managing fatigue; 11-point numeric rating scales measuring fatigue at worst, average, and best; FACT-F and Piper Fatigue Scales, EORTC QLQ-C30 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. All scales had alpha reliabilities greater than 0.7. Data Analysis: Separate analyses of covariance of change scores for each outcome variable between baseline and three follow-up time points were conducted, controlling for the variable&rsquo;s corresponding baseline value. Findings and Implications: Mean fatigue scores for both groups increased over time, however the mean baseline-immediate post-intervention increase was significantly greater for the control group for worst (p&lt;.01) and average fatigue (p&lt;.02), and FACT (p&lt;.04) and Piper Fatigue scores (p&lt;.01). Mean impact of fatigue on social activities, sexual activities and enjoyable activities was greater for the control group (p&lt;.03, p&lt;.01, p&lt;.02 respectively for baseline-immediate post-intervention change scores). These differences were not significant for follow-up assessments. No significant differences in pre-post intervention change scores were identified for confidence with managing fatigue, anxiety, depression, or quality of life (p&gt;.05). Findings suggest educational interventions have potential for assisting women to cope with cancer-related fatigue and its effects, however further research is needed to identify ways to improve the extent and sustainability of such effects.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:34Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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