Agreement Between Child Self-Report and Parent Proxy-Report to Evaluate Quality of Life in Children With Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165491
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Agreement Between Child Self-Report and Parent Proxy-Report to Evaluate Quality of Life in Children With Cancer
Author(s):
Yeh, C .; Chang, P.
Author Details:
C. Yeh, Chang Gung University, School of Nursing, Tao Yuan, Taiwan; P. Chang
Abstract:
Agreement between child self-report and parent proxy-report to evaluate quality of life in children with cancer. Purpose: Assessment of children’s Quality of life (QOL) is a special challenge for clinicians and researchers because developmentally influenced cognitive ability and illness levels are so varied. In addition, statistical strategies reported to evaluate proxy agreement have been inconclusive. This study examines agreement between child reports and parental proxy reports to evaluate quality of life in a sample of pediatric cancer patients using different approaches to evaluate convergence of self-report and proxy-report using product-moment correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation, and comparison between group means and individual differences). Theoretical/Scientific Framework: None Methods: Subjects Data were collected from eligible children with cancer and their parents (hereafter, participants) in treatment at outpatient clinics and in a hospital ward of the Chang Gung Children’s Hospital, a large medical center in Taiwan. Approval for conducting research with human participants was obtained from the hospital prior to beginning of the study. Quality of Life for Children with Cancer (QOLCC) was developed in our previous studies. QOLCC consisted of a total of 34 items and is designed to measure the impact of disease and treatment on the child’s appraisal and satisfaction of functioning in the 5 domains: (1) physical function, defined as functional status in the activities of daily living; (2) psychological function defined as the degree of emotional distress; (3) social function, defined as interpersonal functioning in peer/school relationships; (4) treatment/disease-related symptoms, defined as anxiety and worry about the illness and treatments; and (5) cognitive function, defined as cognitive performance in problem solving. Two subscales of Understanding illness and Communication pattern were also included in QOLCC. Data Analysis: In this study, for the purpose of analysis the data were divided into two main groups: the Child Group and the Adolescent Group. The two groups were determined by the age of the patients, i.e., children (< =12 years) and adolescents (> 12 years), in order to decrease methodological problems caused by the differences in the amount and quality of parental caregiving for younger children and adolescents (Perrin et al., 1991) and potential disagreement between parents and adolescents self-rating of quality of life (Yeh, 2001). In order to compare the differences between parent proxy-report and patient self-report, the mean scores and standard deviations were summarized separately. To evaluate the differences between patients, and proxies report, the means of the absolute differences, the means of the differences (mean bias) (patient group ¡V parent group) and the standard deviation of difference were computed (Bland and Altman, 1986). A mean bias less than zero indicates that the parents tend to overestimate the negative impact of the patients and a mean bias greater than zero indicates that parents tend to underestimate it. The effect size d was used to examine the magnitude of this bias, defined by the ratio of the mean difference by Findings and Implications: Our findings indicate that neither Pearson product correlation, ICC or group difference provided enough information to detect the individual differences of measures of QOL. We found that scatter bias should be supplemented to quantify the degree of individual-level differences. The results suggest that when children who are younger than 12 years are not able to evaluate quality of life assessment due to their developmental limitation or severity of illness, parents can provide valid information about their quality of life. However, parent-proxy of QOL for adolescents provides significantly different information than self report and proxy data of QOL for adolescents should be used with caution.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAgreement Between Child Self-Report and Parent Proxy-Report to Evaluate Quality of Life in Children With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorYeh, C .en_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsC. Yeh, Chang Gung University, School of Nursing, Tao Yuan, Taiwan; P. Changen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165491-
dc.description.abstractAgreement between child self-report and parent proxy-report to evaluate quality of life in children with cancer. Purpose: Assessment of children&rsquo;s Quality of life (QOL) is a special challenge for clinicians and researchers because developmentally influenced cognitive ability and illness levels are so varied. In addition, statistical strategies reported to evaluate proxy agreement have been inconclusive. This study examines agreement between child reports and parental proxy reports to evaluate quality of life in a sample of pediatric cancer patients using different approaches to evaluate convergence of self-report and proxy-report using product-moment correlation coefficient, intraclass correlation, and comparison between group means and individual differences). Theoretical/Scientific Framework: None Methods: Subjects Data were collected from eligible children with cancer and their parents (hereafter, participants) in treatment at outpatient clinics and in a hospital ward of the Chang Gung Children&rsquo;s Hospital, a large medical center in Taiwan. Approval for conducting research with human participants was obtained from the hospital prior to beginning of the study. Quality of Life for Children with Cancer (QOLCC) was developed in our previous studies. QOLCC consisted of a total of 34 items and is designed to measure the impact of disease and treatment on the child&rsquo;s appraisal and satisfaction of functioning in the 5 domains: (1) physical function, defined as functional status in the activities of daily living; (2) psychological function defined as the degree of emotional distress; (3) social function, defined as interpersonal functioning in peer/school relationships; (4) treatment/disease-related symptoms, defined as anxiety and worry about the illness and treatments; and (5) cognitive function, defined as cognitive performance in problem solving. Two subscales of Understanding illness and Communication pattern were also included in QOLCC. Data Analysis: In this study, for the purpose of analysis the data were divided into two main groups: the Child Group and the Adolescent Group. The two groups were determined by the age of the patients, i.e., children (&lt; =12 years) and adolescents (&gt; 12 years), in order to decrease methodological problems caused by the differences in the amount and quality of parental caregiving for younger children and adolescents (Perrin et al., 1991) and potential disagreement between parents and adolescents self-rating of quality of life (Yeh, 2001). In order to compare the differences between parent proxy-report and patient self-report, the mean scores and standard deviations were summarized separately. To evaluate the differences between patients, and proxies report, the means of the absolute differences, the means of the differences (mean bias) (patient group &iexcl;V parent group) and the standard deviation of difference were computed (Bland and Altman, 1986). A mean bias less than zero indicates that the parents tend to overestimate the negative impact of the patients and a mean bias greater than zero indicates that parents tend to underestimate it. The effect size d was used to examine the magnitude of this bias, defined by the ratio of the mean difference by Findings and Implications: Our findings indicate that neither Pearson product correlation, ICC or group difference provided enough information to detect the individual differences of measures of QOL. We found that scatter bias should be supplemented to quantify the degree of individual-level differences. The results suggest that when children who are younger than 12 years are not able to evaluate quality of life assessment due to their developmental limitation or severity of illness, parents can provide valid information about their quality of life. However, parent-proxy of QOL for adolescents provides significantly different information than self report and proxy data of QOL for adolescents should be used with caution.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:35Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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