2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165492
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chemotherapy Induced Alopecia in Men: A Descriptive Study
Author(s):
Yergey, L.; Otto, S.; White, L.; Hausner, P.
Author Details:
L. Yergey, Veterans Administraton Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; S. Otto; L. White; P. Hausner
Abstract:
Chemotherapy causes alopecia in both men and women; however, the literature contains studies and anecdotal reports of chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) in women only. No studies have been done describing either the type of hair loss that occurs in men or men's concerns about alopecia. Purpose: No tool was found in the literature to adequately assess alopecia in men, therefore, a descriptive study, a "Hair Loss Questionnaire", was developed to determine how men describe their experiences with CIA. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Men have different patterns of alopecia, such as loss of beard and moustache, raising the need to explore how gender influences CIA. Methods: Questions were developed based on women's alopecia concerns described in the literature and the author's discussions with men who had CIA. A Likert scale addresses issues such as how much hair has been lost from different body areas, how important it is for the men to have hair, and whether they think they look less attractive or older without hair. An open ended question section addresses additional topics. Demographic data is collected with questions having an impact on the study. Validity is tested by having the men rate "hair loss concern" on an analog scale of 0 (not at all) to 100 (extremely). To test reliability, 30 random men take the questionnaire again one to two weeks later, for test - retest reliability. Data Analysis: The tool is being administered to a convenience sample of 100 men who currently have CIA at a large metropolitan Veterans Administration Medical Center and the affiliated university cancer center. Thus far 40 men have completed the study. Findings and Implications: Data from the initial 40 responses indicate the men are equally divided regarding how important it is for them to have hair, ranging from not at all important to very important. Loss of hair from the head does not rank as important as hair loss from the beard and moustache, eyebrow and eyelashes, or pubic hair. Results of this study will help describe the impact of CIA for men in the study. Hopefully, this information will provide recommendations as to how nurses can help men cope with CIA.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChemotherapy Induced Alopecia in Men: A Descriptive Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYergey, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOtto, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHausner, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Yergey, Veterans Administraton Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; S. Otto; L. White; P. Hausneren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165492-
dc.description.abstractChemotherapy causes alopecia in both men and women; however, the literature contains studies and anecdotal reports of chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) in women only. No studies have been done describing either the type of hair loss that occurs in men or men's concerns about alopecia. Purpose: No tool was found in the literature to adequately assess alopecia in men, therefore, a descriptive study, a "Hair Loss Questionnaire", was developed to determine how men describe their experiences with CIA. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Men have different patterns of alopecia, such as loss of beard and moustache, raising the need to explore how gender influences CIA. Methods: Questions were developed based on women's alopecia concerns described in the literature and the author's discussions with men who had CIA. A Likert scale addresses issues such as how much hair has been lost from different body areas, how important it is for the men to have hair, and whether they think they look less attractive or older without hair. An open ended question section addresses additional topics. Demographic data is collected with questions having an impact on the study. Validity is tested by having the men rate "hair loss concern" on an analog scale of 0 (not at all) to 100 (extremely). To test reliability, 30 random men take the questionnaire again one to two weeks later, for test - retest reliability. Data Analysis: The tool is being administered to a convenience sample of 100 men who currently have CIA at a large metropolitan Veterans Administration Medical Center and the affiliated university cancer center. Thus far 40 men have completed the study. Findings and Implications: Data from the initial 40 responses indicate the men are equally divided regarding how important it is for them to have hair, ranging from not at all important to very important. Loss of hair from the head does not rank as important as hair loss from the beard and moustache, eyebrow and eyelashes, or pubic hair. Results of this study will help describe the impact of CIA for men in the study. Hopefully, this information will provide recommendations as to how nurses can help men cope with CIA.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:36Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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