2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165494
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH - THE EXAMPLE OF MUCOSITIS
Author(s):
Aranda, Sanchia; Yates, Patsy; White, Kate; Saward, Diane
Author Details:
Sanchia Aranda, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia; Patsy Yates, PhD; Kate White, PhD; Diane Saward, Grad Dip
Abstract:
Implementation of best evidence into practice is a priority research area. Barriers to research implementation are well described but few studies examine approaches to practice change. Mucositis is a common problem for people receiving cancer treatment. Evidence shows that good oral hygiene reduces the incidence and severity of mucositis. In practice oral hygiene receives little attention and practices, such as reducing toothbrushing, militate against it. Oral care solutions are overused with no evidence they prevent mucositis. A previous educational approach to implementing good oral hygiene did not achieve sustained change. This project draws on Roger's theory of innovation diffusion, utilising facilitation by peers. Three cancer units, inpatient haematology, day chemotherapy and outpatient radiotherapy, were the intervention targets. Clinical nurses were educated about mucositis prevention, oral assessment and practice change methods focusing on the role of facilitation. The nurses were time-released from practice to implement the oral care protocols, oral assessment tool and patient information brochure. The project aimed to improve oral assessment frequency, patient access to oral care information and to reduce the unnecessary use of oral solutions in mucositis prevention. We also aimed to reduce the prevalence of severe mucositis. The results showed improvement in patient receipt of oral care information (p, 0.01), reduction in the use of oral solutions and improved documentation. The proportion of patients with an oral score of >10 using the oral assessment guide was reduced (p=0.01). Changes were sustained at three months after removal of the facilitators, with some decline in use of the oral assessment tool and patient information brochure. Peer facilitation may help introduction of practice change. Facilitators can make a routine topic interesting and raise interest and support for change amongst peers and interdisciplinary teams. Resistance may relate to perceptions that change indicates current practice is poor. Lessons include the need for rapid return of change data and for greater involvement of nurse managers. Future research will focus on strategies to reduce the decline in change over time. The use of peer facilitators is likely to be useful in a range of clinical settings for practice change but requires further research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Institute of Clinical Studies - Targets Project Grant
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH - THE EXAMPLE OF MUCOSITISen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAranda, Sanchiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorYates, Patsyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaward, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsSanchia Aranda, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia; Patsy Yates, PhD; Kate White, PhD; Diane Saward, Grad Dipen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165494-
dc.description.abstractImplementation of best evidence into practice is a priority research area. Barriers to research implementation are well described but few studies examine approaches to practice change. Mucositis is a common problem for people receiving cancer treatment. Evidence shows that good oral hygiene reduces the incidence and severity of mucositis. In practice oral hygiene receives little attention and practices, such as reducing toothbrushing, militate against it. Oral care solutions are overused with no evidence they prevent mucositis. A previous educational approach to implementing good oral hygiene did not achieve sustained change. This project draws on Roger's theory of innovation diffusion, utilising facilitation by peers. Three cancer units, inpatient haematology, day chemotherapy and outpatient radiotherapy, were the intervention targets. Clinical nurses were educated about mucositis prevention, oral assessment and practice change methods focusing on the role of facilitation. The nurses were time-released from practice to implement the oral care protocols, oral assessment tool and patient information brochure. The project aimed to improve oral assessment frequency, patient access to oral care information and to reduce the unnecessary use of oral solutions in mucositis prevention. We also aimed to reduce the prevalence of severe mucositis. The results showed improvement in patient receipt of oral care information (p, 0.01), reduction in the use of oral solutions and improved documentation. The proportion of patients with an oral score of >10 using the oral assessment guide was reduced (p=0.01). Changes were sustained at three months after removal of the facilitators, with some decline in use of the oral assessment tool and patient information brochure. Peer facilitation may help introduction of practice change. Facilitators can make a routine topic interesting and raise interest and support for change amongst peers and interdisciplinary teams. Resistance may relate to perceptions that change indicates current practice is poor. Lessons include the need for rapid return of change data and for greater involvement of nurse managers. Future research will focus on strategies to reduce the decline in change over time. The use of peer facilitators is likely to be useful in a range of clinical settings for practice change but requires further research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:38Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Institute of Clinical Studies - Targets Project Grant-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.