PEAK EXERCISE RESPONSE TO CLINICAL EXERCISE TESTING USING THE BRUCE PROTOCOL IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER WITH KNOWN CARDIOVASCULAR, PULMONARY, OR METABOLIC DISEASE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165495
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PEAK EXERCISE RESPONSE TO CLINICAL EXERCISE TESTING USING THE BRUCE PROTOCOL IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER WITH KNOWN CARDIOVASCULAR, PULMONARY, OR METABOLIC DISEASE
Author(s):
Arzola, Sonya; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Leclerc, Kenneth Leclerc; Nowlin, Marilyn
Author Details:
Sonya Arzola, BS, Brooke Army Medical Center, Geneva Foundation, Ft. Sam, Houston, Texas, USA; Stacey Young-McCaughan, RN, PhD, AOCN; Kenneth Leclerc, MD; Marilyn Nowlin, RN, BS, BSN
Abstract:
To describe how a group of patients with cancer who had completed treatment with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease responded to peak exercise using the Bruce protocol. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that individuals with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease receive a clinical exercise test prior to starting a moderate intensity exercise program. To our knowledge a description of peak exercise response to the Bruce protocol in patients with cancer with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease six months post surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy treatment has not been reported. All subjects were cleared to participate in the clinical exercise test by their designated primary care provider, the study oncologist, and the study cardiologist. ACSM guidelines for clinical exercise testing were followed. The speed, grade, and duration of the clinical exercise test were dictated by the Bruce protocol. The McConnell formula was selected to predict maximal oxygen consumption, which was then converted into metabolic equivalent (METS). Of the 62 patients consented to participate in the study, approximately half (n = 33) had known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease. Of the 33 patients with known disease, 39% (n=13) were post treatment. Subjects had seven different types of cancer at all stages of disease. At baseline testing peak oxygen consumption, mean METS was 6.6 (SD = 1.43), heart rate 145.9 bpm (SD = 23.31), systolic blood pressure 175 mm Hg (SD = 19.2), diastolic blood pressure 78.1 mm Hg (SD = 10.37), and perceived exertion 15.3 (SD = 2.02). Each of these measures was similar to what would be expected in a similar population of patients with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease. In this sample of patients with cancer with known disease six months post treatment, peak exercise response to the Bruce protocol was similar to that of non-cancer populations with known disease. In a growing number studies that have investigated exercise rehabilitation in patients with cancer, dramatic improvements in physiological and psychological functioning have been documented. How clinical and research exercise testing should be safely conducted in this patient population is currently being defined and refined. This work suggests that standard ACSM precautions for exercise testing and training are appropriate for patients who have undergone treatment for cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Department of Defense Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences TriService Nursing Research Program, N98-051
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePEAK EXERCISE RESPONSE TO CLINICAL EXERCISE TESTING USING THE BRUCE PROTOCOL IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER WITH KNOWN CARDIOVASCULAR, PULMONARY, OR METABOLIC DISEASEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArzola, Sonyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung-McCaughan, Staceyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeclerc, Kenneth Leclercen_US
dc.contributor.authorNowlin, Marilynen_US
dc.author.detailsSonya Arzola, BS, Brooke Army Medical Center, Geneva Foundation, Ft. Sam, Houston, Texas, USA; Stacey Young-McCaughan, RN, PhD, AOCN; Kenneth Leclerc, MD; Marilyn Nowlin, RN, BS, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165495-
dc.description.abstractTo describe how a group of patients with cancer who had completed treatment with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease responded to peak exercise using the Bruce protocol. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that individuals with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease receive a clinical exercise test prior to starting a moderate intensity exercise program. To our knowledge a description of peak exercise response to the Bruce protocol in patients with cancer with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease six months post surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy treatment has not been reported. All subjects were cleared to participate in the clinical exercise test by their designated primary care provider, the study oncologist, and the study cardiologist. ACSM guidelines for clinical exercise testing were followed. The speed, grade, and duration of the clinical exercise test were dictated by the Bruce protocol. The McConnell formula was selected to predict maximal oxygen consumption, which was then converted into metabolic equivalent (METS). Of the 62 patients consented to participate in the study, approximately half (n = 33) had known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease. Of the 33 patients with known disease, 39% (n=13) were post treatment. Subjects had seven different types of cancer at all stages of disease. At baseline testing peak oxygen consumption, mean METS was 6.6 (SD = 1.43), heart rate 145.9 bpm (SD = 23.31), systolic blood pressure 175 mm Hg (SD = 19.2), diastolic blood pressure 78.1 mm Hg (SD = 10.37), and perceived exertion 15.3 (SD = 2.02). Each of these measures was similar to what would be expected in a similar population of patients with known cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic disease. In this sample of patients with cancer with known disease six months post treatment, peak exercise response to the Bruce protocol was similar to that of non-cancer populations with known disease. In a growing number studies that have investigated exercise rehabilitation in patients with cancer, dramatic improvements in physiological and psychological functioning have been documented. How clinical and research exercise testing should be safely conducted in this patient population is currently being defined and refined. This work suggests that standard ACSM precautions for exercise testing and training are appropriate for patients who have undergone treatment for cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:39Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Department of Defense Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences TriService Nursing Research Program, N98-051-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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