2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165497
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYMPTOM EXPERIENCE OF RURAL AND URBAN OLDER ADULT CANCER SURVIVORS
Author(s):
Beck, Susan; Dudley, William N.; Lindau, Karen
Author Details:
Susan Beck, PhD, FAAN, AOCN, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; William N. Dudley, PhD; Karen Lindau, MS
Abstract:
There is a ten-fold increase in cancer incident rates for those over 65, a population that is growing exponentially in the U.S. The Institute of Medicine has recommended research to establish baseline data regarding the cancer experience in medically underserved populations including the elderly and those living in rural communities. Such underserved populations may have insufficient access to information, resources, and social support following cancer treatment. The aims of this study are: 1) to document the symptom experience and quality of life in older adult cancer survivors during the period of early survivorship and 2) to compare urban and rural survivors. The study was guided by the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms which includes three major concepts: the symptoms, influencing factors, and situational factors. This descriptive, comparative, repeated measures study compares elderly cancer survivors in rural and urban settings following completion of cancer treatment. At one, three, and fifteen months post-treatment, each participant was mailed a questionnaire addressing their symptom experience using psychometrically sound tools (i.e., Brief Pain Inventory, General Fatigue Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Geriatric Depression Scale and the SF-12). Measures of central tendency and repeated measures ANOVA were used. Twenty-four females and 31 males ranging in age from 65-81 (mean age = 71.56) participated. Twenty-five percent (25%) were age 75 or older. A 1-year follow-up was completed on 33 (60%) of the participants. Survivors continue to experience a significant number (Mean=3.9) of symptoms for up to 15 months post-treatment. Fatigue, insomnia, and pain persisted with a moderate severity level on average at each time point; there was no significant improvement over time (p>.10). The majority of participants were not depressed and scored highly on the SF-12 Mental Health Status. Physical functioning was less than the national norm for elderly individuals or those with a chronic disease but did significantly improve over time (p=.011). Those in rural areas reported less physical functioning at each time point (p=.08). This study provides a foundation regarding the needs of older adult survivors and informs future studies to test interventions to improve the care of this underserved population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute Supplement to 3P30CA42014-15 (S. Prescott PI)
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM EXPERIENCE OF RURAL AND URBAN OLDER ADULT CANCER SURVIVORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDudley, William N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLindau, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Beck, PhD, FAAN, AOCN, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; William N. Dudley, PhD; Karen Lindau, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165497-
dc.description.abstractThere is a ten-fold increase in cancer incident rates for those over 65, a population that is growing exponentially in the U.S. The Institute of Medicine has recommended research to establish baseline data regarding the cancer experience in medically underserved populations including the elderly and those living in rural communities. Such underserved populations may have insufficient access to information, resources, and social support following cancer treatment. The aims of this study are: 1) to document the symptom experience and quality of life in older adult cancer survivors during the period of early survivorship and 2) to compare urban and rural survivors. The study was guided by the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms which includes three major concepts: the symptoms, influencing factors, and situational factors. This descriptive, comparative, repeated measures study compares elderly cancer survivors in rural and urban settings following completion of cancer treatment. At one, three, and fifteen months post-treatment, each participant was mailed a questionnaire addressing their symptom experience using psychometrically sound tools (i.e., Brief Pain Inventory, General Fatigue Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Geriatric Depression Scale and the SF-12). Measures of central tendency and repeated measures ANOVA were used. Twenty-four females and 31 males ranging in age from 65-81 (mean age = 71.56) participated. Twenty-five percent (25%) were age 75 or older. A 1-year follow-up was completed on 33 (60%) of the participants. Survivors continue to experience a significant number (Mean=3.9) of symptoms for up to 15 months post-treatment. Fatigue, insomnia, and pain persisted with a moderate severity level on average at each time point; there was no significant improvement over time (p>.10). The majority of participants were not depressed and scored highly on the SF-12 Mental Health Status. Physical functioning was less than the national norm for elderly individuals or those with a chronic disease but did significantly improve over time (p=.011). Those in rural areas reported less physical functioning at each time point (p=.08). This study provides a foundation regarding the needs of older adult survivors and informs future studies to test interventions to improve the care of this underserved population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:42Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute Supplement to 3P30CA42014-15 (S. Prescott PI)-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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