PATTERNS AND RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SYMPTOMS AND FATIGUE DURING AND FOLLOWING ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165498
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PATTERNS AND RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SYMPTOMS AND FATIGUE DURING AND FOLLOWING ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Berger, Ann; Bakken, Suzanne
Author Details:
Ann Berger, PhD, RN, AOCN, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; Suzanne Bakken, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Recent research findings identify the significant role symptoms play in influencing fatigue during and following adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. It is essential that we know about relationships among physical and psychological symptoms and fatigue before designing fatigue intervention studies. This study’s purpose was to examine the patterns and relationships among physical (nausea, appetite, pain, concentration, bowels, appearance, sleep) and psychological (depression, anxiety) symptoms and fatigue during four treatments and 30, 60, 90 days after the last treatment and 1 year after the first treatment of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Theoretical framework was Piper’s Integrated Fatigue Model. This work is part of a prospective, repeated measures, quasi-experimental feasibility study that examines the outcomes of an intervention to improve sleep and fatigue. Sample: 25 Caucasian, English-speaking women, post-surgery, who completed doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy for stage I or II breast cancer, mean age = 54.3, most married and employed full or part time. Reliable and valid instruments included Piper Fatigue Scale, Symptom Experience Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Descriptive, correlations, and regression analyses were performed. All symptoms fluctuated during and following chemotherapy for breast cancer. After fatigue, sleep disturbance was the most frequent, intense, and distressing symptom. Mean total fatigue scores (PFS) also fluctuated over time (2.9–5.9, SD= 1.5-2.8). Significant correlations were found between fatigue (PFS) and the combined score of the remaining seven physical symptoms (SES) (r= 0.46- 0.60, p < .02-.001) and between fatigue (PFS) and/or anxiety and depression (HADS) (0.46-0.79, p< .004- 0.001). Fatigue was most frequently correlated with the individual physical symptoms of sleep disturbance, pain and nausea and the psychological symptoms of depression and anxiety. Regression analyses identified specific clusters of symptoms associated with fatigue at all times except 1 year after the first treatment (R2=.33- .48; F= 4.82- 9.80, p=.02-.001). Symptoms, including fatigue, sleep disturbances, pain and depression, are experienced both individually and in clusters at all measurement points during and following chemotherapy. Nurses must vigilantly assess symptoms in order to identify symptom clusters that influence fatigue during and following chemotherapy. Interventions are needed to prevent chronic symptom distress after chemotherapy ends.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePATTERNS AND RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SYMPTOMS AND FATIGUE DURING AND FOLLOWING ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorBakken, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Berger, PhD, RN, AOCN, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; Suzanne Bakken, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165498-
dc.description.abstractRecent research findings identify the significant role symptoms play in influencing fatigue during and following adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. It is essential that we know about relationships among physical and psychological symptoms and fatigue before designing fatigue intervention studies. This study&rsquo;s purpose was to examine the patterns and relationships among physical (nausea, appetite, pain, concentration, bowels, appearance, sleep) and psychological (depression, anxiety) symptoms and fatigue during four treatments and 30, 60, 90 days after the last treatment and 1 year after the first treatment of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Theoretical framework was Piper&rsquo;s Integrated Fatigue Model. This work is part of a prospective, repeated measures, quasi-experimental feasibility study that examines the outcomes of an intervention to improve sleep and fatigue. Sample: 25 Caucasian, English-speaking women, post-surgery, who completed doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy for stage I or II breast cancer, mean age = 54.3, most married and employed full or part time. Reliable and valid instruments included Piper Fatigue Scale, Symptom Experience Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Descriptive, correlations, and regression analyses were performed. All symptoms fluctuated during and following chemotherapy for breast cancer. After fatigue, sleep disturbance was the most frequent, intense, and distressing symptom. Mean total fatigue scores (PFS) also fluctuated over time (2.9&ndash;5.9, SD= 1.5-2.8). Significant correlations were found between fatigue (PFS) and the combined score of the remaining seven physical symptoms (SES) (r= 0.46- 0.60, p &lt; .02-.001) and between fatigue (PFS) and/or anxiety and depression (HADS) (0.46-0.79, p&lt; .004- 0.001). Fatigue was most frequently correlated with the individual physical symptoms of sleep disturbance, pain and nausea and the psychological symptoms of depression and anxiety. Regression analyses identified specific clusters of symptoms associated with fatigue at all times except 1 year after the first treatment (R2=.33- .48; F= 4.82- 9.80, p=.02-.001). Symptoms, including fatigue, sleep disturbances, pain and depression, are experienced both individually and in clusters at all measurement points during and following chemotherapy. Nurses must vigilantly assess symptoms in order to identify symptom clusters that influence fatigue during and following chemotherapy. Interventions are needed to prevent chronic symptom distress after chemotherapy ends.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:43Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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