2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165501
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CAREGIVER DISTRESS: A ROLE FOR SCREENING
Author(s):
Borneman, Tami; Ingham, Jane
Author Details:
Tami Borneman, RN, MSN, CNS, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; Jane Ingham, MBBS, FRACP
Abstract:
Caregivers (CGs) of advanced cancer patients often report emotional distress and unmet needs, yet no standard exists for identifying distress in the clinic setting. CG distress is often under-recognized by health care providers and risks impacting both CG well-being and patient care. Thus, the role of screening for CG distress is relevant and important. Explore instruments that assess CG health and distress outcomes. Specifically explored were ranges of scores on several standard mental health instruments for CG’s, and an evaluation of the validity of the “Distress Thermometer” - a self-administered screening tool for detection of distress. A longitudinal study, using a conceptual model of the caregiving experience to evaluate relationships between CG unmet needs, burden, perceptions of CG distress and health outcomes. Patient-CG dyads in an outpatient cancer setting completed self report questionnaires including mental and physical health and distress measures: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), the SF-12 Health Survey-Mental (MCS 12) and Physical Components Summary Scale (PCS 12), and the use of a Distress Thermometer. Descriptive and comparative statistics for pt and CG demographics; Pearson correlations to detect strength of association between CG health measures and CG distress thermometer self-rating; and a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) of CG distress (dependent variable) using health measures that were significantly correlated with the distress thermometer (p<0.05). 45 CGs provided data. Mean age 55.6 (+9.8), 21.3% were male. CES-D Mean 14.4 SD +10.1, Range 0-35.0, (Cut-off for depression 16); MCS(SF-12) Mean: 43.7 SD +10.9 Range 20.6-59.8; Distress Thermometer Mean 4.97 (+2.5) Range 0-10 (0=No Distress 10=Extreme Distress). Mean CG distress correlated with the CES-D scores and the MCS(SF-12) but not with physical function. In the GLM the only significant association was between SF-12 MCS and CG distress. Conclusions were 1) CG distress is prevalent 2) CG distress thermometer may be worthy of further study as a screening measure for psychological distress in CGs. Nurses are in a prime position to help screen for CG distress thus facilitating interventions that would address or minimize their distress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Supported in part by NINR Grant 1R21NR05225-02
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCAREGIVER DISTRESS: A ROLE FOR SCREENINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBorneman, Tamien_US
dc.contributor.authorIngham, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsTami Borneman, RN, MSN, CNS, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; Jane Ingham, MBBS, FRACPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165501-
dc.description.abstractCaregivers (CGs) of advanced cancer patients often report emotional distress and unmet needs, yet no standard exists for identifying distress in the clinic setting. CG distress is often under-recognized by health care providers and risks impacting both CG well-being and patient care. Thus, the role of screening for CG distress is relevant and important. Explore instruments that assess CG health and distress outcomes. Specifically explored were ranges of scores on several standard mental health instruments for CG&rsquo;s, and an evaluation of the validity of the &ldquo;Distress Thermometer&rdquo; - a self-administered screening tool for detection of distress. A longitudinal study, using a conceptual model of the caregiving experience to evaluate relationships between CG unmet needs, burden, perceptions of CG distress and health outcomes. Patient-CG dyads in an outpatient cancer setting completed self report questionnaires including mental and physical health and distress measures: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), the SF-12 Health Survey-Mental (MCS 12) and Physical Components Summary Scale (PCS 12), and the use of a Distress Thermometer. Descriptive and comparative statistics for pt and CG demographics; Pearson correlations to detect strength of association between CG health measures and CG distress thermometer self-rating; and a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) of CG distress (dependent variable) using health measures that were significantly correlated with the distress thermometer (p&lt;0.05). 45 CGs provided data. Mean age 55.6 (+9.8), 21.3% were male. CES-D Mean 14.4 SD +10.1, Range 0-35.0, (Cut-off for depression 16); MCS(SF-12) Mean: 43.7 SD +10.9 Range 20.6-59.8; Distress Thermometer Mean 4.97 (+2.5) Range 0-10 (0=No Distress 10=Extreme Distress). Mean CG distress correlated with the CES-D scores and the MCS(SF-12) but not with physical function. In the GLM the only significant association was between SF-12 MCS and CG distress. Conclusions were 1) CG distress is prevalent 2) CG distress thermometer may be worthy of further study as a screening measure for psychological distress in CGs. Nurses are in a prime position to help screen for CG distress thus facilitating interventions that would address or minimize their distress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:46Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Supported in part by NINR Grant 1R21NR05225-02-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.