INCREASING TESTICULAR SELF-EXAMINATION IN ACTIVE DUTY SOLDIERS: AN INTERVENTION STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165503
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INCREASING TESTICULAR SELF-EXAMINATION IN ACTIVE DUTY SOLDIERS: AN INTERVENTION STUDY
Author(s):
Brown, Carlton
Author Details:
Carlton Brown, RN, MSN, AOCN, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA
Abstract:
Testicular cancer (TC ) is the most common malignancy in men 18-35. Approximately 80% of military men are at risk for TC. There was an increase in TC of 78% in military men between 1988-1996. Sixty-six percent of America’s military do not perform monthly TSE; only half have ever received any education about TC or TSE. The purpose of this study was to determine which educational information program, (printed materials and shower card reminder only method vs. a peer education video and shower card reminder) is the most effective in increasing the proportion of soldiers who practice testicular self-examination. The Health Belief Model was used as a framework focusing specifically of perceived benefits, barriers, seriousness, and susceptibility. Protocol was modified to a “post-test only”. Blesch's Men's Health Belief Survey was used to collect data and Cronbach's Alpha for the four subscales include: barriers (0.78), benefits (0.85), susceptibility (0.64), and seriousness (0.34). Item analysis was also completed on Blesch tool. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the sample and the group demographics. Nonparametric analyses were conducted to examine group differences in categorical dependent variables. The majority of the participants had heard of TC (89.1%) and TSE (79.6%). Only 1/4 of the sample reported practicing TSE every month. More than half of the sample had never been examined for TC by a health care provider. No statistically significant differences were found between groups in performing TSE correctly (every month). However, no participant in Group B (Video Group) reported NEVER performing TSE. No statistically significant group differences were found on knowledge, benefits, susceptibility, or seriousness. There was a significant difference between Groups B (Video) and C (Control) in their beliefs regarding barriers to the performance of TSE (p=.047). This study has several implications for nursing and other health care professionals. First, soldiers need educational interventions for TC and TSE. Second, providers must make testicular exam a part of routine physical exams. Third, there is a need for further study of the effectiveness of these health promotion methods.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Triservice Nursing Research Grant
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINCREASING TESTICULAR SELF-EXAMINATION IN ACTIVE DUTY SOLDIERS: AN INTERVENTION STUDYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Carltonen_US
dc.author.detailsCarlton Brown, RN, MSN, AOCN, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165503-
dc.description.abstractTesticular cancer (TC ) is the most common malignancy in men 18-35. Approximately 80% of military men are at risk for TC. There was an increase in TC of 78% in military men between 1988-1996. Sixty-six percent of America’s military do not perform monthly TSE; only half have ever received any education about TC or TSE. The purpose of this study was to determine which educational information program, (printed materials and shower card reminder only method vs. a peer education video and shower card reminder) is the most effective in increasing the proportion of soldiers who practice testicular self-examination. The Health Belief Model was used as a framework focusing specifically of perceived benefits, barriers, seriousness, and susceptibility. Protocol was modified to a “post-test only”. Blesch's Men's Health Belief Survey was used to collect data and Cronbach's Alpha for the four subscales include: barriers (0.78), benefits (0.85), susceptibility (0.64), and seriousness (0.34). Item analysis was also completed on Blesch tool. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the sample and the group demographics. Nonparametric analyses were conducted to examine group differences in categorical dependent variables. The majority of the participants had heard of TC (89.1%) and TSE (79.6%). Only 1/4 of the sample reported practicing TSE every month. More than half of the sample had never been examined for TC by a health care provider. No statistically significant differences were found between groups in performing TSE correctly (every month). However, no participant in Group B (Video Group) reported NEVER performing TSE. No statistically significant group differences were found on knowledge, benefits, susceptibility, or seriousness. There was a significant difference between Groups B (Video) and C (Control) in their beliefs regarding barriers to the performance of TSE (p=.047). This study has several implications for nursing and other health care professionals. First, soldiers need educational interventions for TC and TSE. Second, providers must make testicular exam a part of routine physical exams. Third, there is a need for further study of the effectiveness of these health promotion methods.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:48Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Triservice Nursing Research Grant-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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