TAILORED VS TARGETED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE MAMMOGRAPHY ADHERENCE IN LOW-INCOME AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165506
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
TAILORED VS TARGETED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE MAMMOGRAPHY ADHERENCE IN LOW-INCOME AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Author(s):
Champion, Victoria; Springston, Jeff; Zollinger, Terry; Saywell, Robert; Russell, Katherine; Monahan, Patrick; Zhoa, Quiangian
Author Details:
Victoria Champion, DNS,RN, Indiana University, School of Nursing, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; Jeff Springston, PhD; Terry Zollinger, PhD; Robert Saywell, Jr., PhD; Katherine Russell, DNS, RN; Patrick Monahan, PhD; Quiangian Zhoa, PhD
Abstract:
Breast cancer continues to be a major cause of mortality for African American women, ranking as the second leading cause of cancer death within this population. Low-income African American women are at relatively high risk for breast cancer mortality due in part to their limited mammography use. The purpose of this randomized prospective study was to compare a tailored interactive computer intervention with a targeted video; both developed to increase mammography screening among low-income African American women who were non adherent to mammography at baseline. Both intervention groups were compared to a usual care group. Both targeted and tailored interventions used a combination of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) and Health Belief Model (HBM) to develop intervention content. A total of 299 African American women who were 45 to 75 and had not had a mammogram in the last 15 months were consented and randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) Usual Care, 2) Targeted Video, and 3) Tailored Interactive Computer. Mean age was 50. 63 and the average educational level attained was 12.34 years of formal school. A total of 33 % were currently partnered and 67% did not live with a partner. Data were collected in person at baseline and at 3 months post intervention by telephone. Instruments measured theoretical beliefs of perceived risk, perceived benefits and barriers to mammography screening, self efficacy for mammography, and demographic variables. Validity and reliability had been established in prior work. Mammography status was measured by self-report and women were classified in Pre Contemplation (not thinking about having a mammogram), Contemplation (thinking about having a mammogram) or Action (had a mammogram after the intervention. Results indicated that stage of mammography adoption did differ by intervention group (p <.04). For participants in the usual care group 32% were in Action at 3 months, versus 25% in the video group and 40% in the interactive computer group. Results indicate that a tailored interactive intervention resulted in the highest level of adherence post intervention. Results can guide nurses to deliver interventions that will increase mammography screening in low-income African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTAILORED VS TARGETED INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE MAMMOGRAPHY ADHERENCE IN LOW-INCOME AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChampion, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpringston, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.authorZollinger, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaywell, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMonahan, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorZhoa, Quiangianen_US
dc.author.detailsVictoria Champion, DNS,RN, Indiana University, School of Nursing, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; Jeff Springston, PhD; Terry Zollinger, PhD; Robert Saywell, Jr., PhD; Katherine Russell, DNS, RN; Patrick Monahan, PhD; Quiangian Zhoa, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165506-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer continues to be a major cause of mortality for African American women, ranking as the second leading cause of cancer death within this population. Low-income African American women are at relatively high risk for breast cancer mortality due in part to their limited mammography use. The purpose of this randomized prospective study was to compare a tailored interactive computer intervention with a targeted video; both developed to increase mammography screening among low-income African American women who were non adherent to mammography at baseline. Both intervention groups were compared to a usual care group. Both targeted and tailored interventions used a combination of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) and Health Belief Model (HBM) to develop intervention content. A total of 299 African American women who were 45 to 75 and had not had a mammogram in the last 15 months were consented and randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) Usual Care, 2) Targeted Video, and 3) Tailored Interactive Computer. Mean age was 50. 63 and the average educational level attained was 12.34 years of formal school. A total of 33 % were currently partnered and 67% did not live with a partner. Data were collected in person at baseline and at 3 months post intervention by telephone. Instruments measured theoretical beliefs of perceived risk, perceived benefits and barriers to mammography screening, self efficacy for mammography, and demographic variables. Validity and reliability had been established in prior work. Mammography status was measured by self-report and women were classified in Pre Contemplation (not thinking about having a mammogram), Contemplation (thinking about having a mammogram) or Action (had a mammogram after the intervention. Results indicated that stage of mammography adoption did differ by intervention group (p &lt;.04). For participants in the usual care group 32% were in Action at 3 months, versus 25% in the video group and 40% in the interactive computer group. Results indicate that a tailored interactive intervention resulted in the highest level of adherence post intervention. Results can guide nurses to deliver interventions that will increase mammography screening in low-income African American women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:52Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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