2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165512
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPARING NURSES AND PATIENTS VIEW OF INTERNET USE FOR CANCER CARE
Author(s):
Dickerson, Suzanne; Boehmke, Marcia; Brown, Jean
Author Details:
Suzanne Dickerson, DNS, RN, University of Buffalo, Southern University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA; Marcia Boehmke, DNS, RN, ANP-CS; Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
While there are a multitude of cancer-related web sites available, little research has been done to compare nurses’ and patients’ views of Internet use for cancer care. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the similarities and differences of oncology nurses’ and patients’ view of Internet use for cancer care through phenomenological interpretation of their narrative stories. In the interpretive phenomenological approach underlying a Heideggerian hermeneutical study, the researchers discovers the common meanings the practical knowledge of Internet use for cancer care through interpretation of narrative stories. Design: Hermeneutic phenomenology was the interpretive approach used to gain understanding of human experience through analysis of narrative text. Population, Sample, Setting: 20 nurses and 20 patients comprised the informants. The nurses were recruited from local and national ONS meetings. Patients were recruited by the oncology nurses and had a variety of cancer diagnoses. Methods: Participants were individually interviewed and asked to tell stories of Internet use. The interviews were audio taped and transcribed providing data for interpretive analysis. Narratives [Texts] used in this study were interpreted by the seven-stage hermeneutical process (Diekelmann et al., 1989; Diekelmann & Ironside, 1998). Findings: Similarities included: 1.) Varying Internet uses and computer competencies. 2.) Gaining information regarding cancer care from a variety of web sources. 3.) Redefining patient/provider relationships and 4.) Connecting to peer supports using the Internet. Differences included: 1.) Patients utilize computer savvy support network to gain information for decision making and validating treatment decisions, 2.) Differing views of ability to determine quality and appropriateness of Internet information. 3.) Variety of responses from providers regarding treatment option discussions especially when discussing alternative approaches. 4.) Value of peer interactions and knowledge gained from talking to others with similar diagnoses. Implications: Computer savvy patients are creating the need for new interaction patterns and relationships with providers. Nurse patient partnerships may then dialogue to determine quality and appropriateness of Internet information. The movement suggests a need for nurse Internet competencies, environmental support, and consideration for patient access (digital divide).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Bristol-Meyers Oncology
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARING NURSES AND PATIENTS VIEW OF INTERNET USE FOR CANCER CAREen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoehmke, Marciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Dickerson, DNS, RN, University of Buffalo, Southern University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA; Marcia Boehmke, DNS, RN, ANP-CS; Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165512-
dc.description.abstractWhile there are a multitude of cancer-related web sites available, little research has been done to compare nurses’ and patients’ views of Internet use for cancer care. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the similarities and differences of oncology nurses’ and patients’ view of Internet use for cancer care through phenomenological interpretation of their narrative stories. In the interpretive phenomenological approach underlying a Heideggerian hermeneutical study, the researchers discovers the common meanings the practical knowledge of Internet use for cancer care through interpretation of narrative stories. Design: Hermeneutic phenomenology was the interpretive approach used to gain understanding of human experience through analysis of narrative text. Population, Sample, Setting: 20 nurses and 20 patients comprised the informants. The nurses were recruited from local and national ONS meetings. Patients were recruited by the oncology nurses and had a variety of cancer diagnoses. Methods: Participants were individually interviewed and asked to tell stories of Internet use. The interviews were audio taped and transcribed providing data for interpretive analysis. Narratives [Texts] used in this study were interpreted by the seven-stage hermeneutical process (Diekelmann et al., 1989; Diekelmann & Ironside, 1998). Findings: Similarities included: 1.) Varying Internet uses and computer competencies. 2.) Gaining information regarding cancer care from a variety of web sources. 3.) Redefining patient/provider relationships and 4.) Connecting to peer supports using the Internet. Differences included: 1.) Patients utilize computer savvy support network to gain information for decision making and validating treatment decisions, 2.) Differing views of ability to determine quality and appropriateness of Internet information. 3.) Variety of responses from providers regarding treatment option discussions especially when discussing alternative approaches. 4.) Value of peer interactions and knowledge gained from talking to others with similar diagnoses. Implications: Computer savvy patients are creating the need for new interaction patterns and relationships with providers. Nurse patient partnerships may then dialogue to determine quality and appropriateness of Internet information. The movement suggests a need for nurse Internet competencies, environmental support, and consideration for patient access (digital divide).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:58Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Bristol-Meyers Oncology-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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