EXPERIENCE OF WOMEN TREATED WITH HDR BRACHYTHERAPY USING THE MAMMOSITE CATHETER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165513
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPERIENCE OF WOMEN TREATED WITH HDR BRACHYTHERAPY USING THE MAMMOSITE CATHETER
Author(s):
Dienger, Joy; Brophy, Lynne; Berning, Patricia
Author Details:
Joy Dienger, DNSc, RN, University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Lynne Brophy, MSN, RN, OCN; Patricia Berning, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the number two killer of women in the United States. Many women diagnosed with the disease are eligible for breast conservation therapy consisting of lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy. A new method for delivering radiation therapy using high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the MammoSite® Catheter is now available. Oncology nurses play a vital role in the care of women undergoing radiation therapy. Accurate information regarding the experience of women undergoing this method of radiation therapy is needed for nurses to effectively provide education, symptom management and emotional support. Data reporting the experience of women undergoing HDR brachytherapy using the MammoSite® Catheter are limited. This pilot study sought to increase knowledge regarding symptoms experienced, ability to perform ADLs, and satisfaction with treatment outcome. Forty-percent of women eligible for breast conservation therapy choose mastectomy to avoid the seven week regimen of external beam radiation (ERT) therapy. The treatment duration is especially an issue for women who live far from treatment centers, work full-time, and/or desire quick closure to the treatment stage of their disease. This HDR brachytherapy delivers the radiation dose over five days of outpatient therapy. It should appeal to many women, offer decreased symptom distress and improved quality of life (QOL) while providing treatment efficacy and cosmetic outcome equal to ERT. Using a descriptive retrospective design, 14 women who completed the HDR brachytherapy using the MammoSite® catheter during the first nine months of availability participated in a structured taped telephone interview. The interview questions were based upon information found in the literature and recorded in radiation therapy treatment records. Data were analyzed for type and frequency of symptom experienced. Symptoms reported included: mild/moderate erythema, dryness, itching, and blistering of the skin; discomfort, bulky, heavy feeling associated with the catheter; and fatigue. Four worked during the treatment period. Most denied limitations to usual personal/household activities and 78.5% rated their cosmetic outcome as good or excellent. All claimed satisfaction with treatment, however lack of sufficient information remains. Data are being used to plan a larger prospective study, to develop patient education materials, and to refine symptom management techniques.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Deans Research Award, University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPERIENCE OF WOMEN TREATED WITH HDR BRACHYTHERAPY USING THE MAMMOSITE CATHETERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDienger, Joyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrophy, Lynneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerning, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsJoy Dienger, DNSc, RN, University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Lynne Brophy, MSN, RN, OCN; Patricia Berning, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165513-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the number two killer of women in the United States. Many women diagnosed with the disease are eligible for breast conservation therapy consisting of lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy. A new method for delivering radiation therapy using high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the MammoSite® Catheter is now available. Oncology nurses play a vital role in the care of women undergoing radiation therapy. Accurate information regarding the experience of women undergoing this method of radiation therapy is needed for nurses to effectively provide education, symptom management and emotional support. Data reporting the experience of women undergoing HDR brachytherapy using the MammoSite® Catheter are limited. This pilot study sought to increase knowledge regarding symptoms experienced, ability to perform ADLs, and satisfaction with treatment outcome. Forty-percent of women eligible for breast conservation therapy choose mastectomy to avoid the seven week regimen of external beam radiation (ERT) therapy. The treatment duration is especially an issue for women who live far from treatment centers, work full-time, and/or desire quick closure to the treatment stage of their disease. This HDR brachytherapy delivers the radiation dose over five days of outpatient therapy. It should appeal to many women, offer decreased symptom distress and improved quality of life (QOL) while providing treatment efficacy and cosmetic outcome equal to ERT. Using a descriptive retrospective design, 14 women who completed the HDR brachytherapy using the MammoSite® catheter during the first nine months of availability participated in a structured taped telephone interview. The interview questions were based upon information found in the literature and recorded in radiation therapy treatment records. Data were analyzed for type and frequency of symptom experienced. Symptoms reported included: mild/moderate erythema, dryness, itching, and blistering of the skin; discomfort, bulky, heavy feeling associated with the catheter; and fatigue. Four worked during the treatment period. Most denied limitations to usual personal/household activities and 78.5% rated their cosmetic outcome as good or excellent. All claimed satisfaction with treatment, however lack of sufficient information remains. Data are being used to plan a larger prospective study, to develop patient education materials, and to refine symptom management techniques.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:19:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:19:59Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Deans Research Award, University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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