A DISCURSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE MEANING OF HOPE FOR OLDER PALLIATIVE CANCER PATIENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165516
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A DISCURSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE MEANING OF HOPE FOR OLDER PALLIATIVE CANCER PATIENTS
Author(s):
Duggleby, Wendy; Murdock, Natasha; Wright, Karen
Author Details:
Wendy Duggleby, DSN, RN, AOCN, College of Nursing, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; Natasha Murdock, BSN, RN, Masters in Nursing Student; Karen Wright, PhD RN
Abstract:
Health care professionals who define hope as cure often view the hope of terminally ill patients as a form of denial or false reality. These views have been found to decrease palliative patients’ quality of life (Hall, 1990). Therefore, oncology nurses who understand the meaning of hope for older palliative cancer patients can contribute to their quality of life. A secondary analysis of data from a qualitative study exploring the experience of hope in older palliative cancer patients was conducted to understand the meaning of hope within the culture of the dying cancer patient while accommodating the historical context. The specific aim was to describe the meaning of hope for palliative home care patients with cancer within their social context. The philosophical frame for this study was Potter and Wetherell's (1987) discourse theory, which explores the meaning of concepts using function, construction and variation. The few reported studies focusing on hope in palliative patients have not explored the meaning of hope within the social context of someone who is dying. Saturation was reached with 10 palliative patients with advanced cancer (mean age 75 yrs) who were interviewed in their homes using open-ended questions. Six of the participants were able to complete a second interview where they reviewed their transcripts for accuracy and added additional information if they wanted. Data were analyzed line-by-line examining how hope was used as function; it's construction in dialogue, and how it varied depending upon the social context in which dialogue occurred. As themes emerged memos were kept regarding the social context in which the meaning of hope was described. Throughout the analysis, the research assistant and PI selectively analyzed data separately and then would meet to compare the analysis. Six themes emerged: hope as trust, duty, belief, control, value and worth, and emotion. Variation was encountered in the different stories that each participant described related to social context and function of the word. The results of this study provide a foundation for future research on hope and hope fostering strategies that can be used by oncology nurses to foster hope in older palliative cancer patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: The University of Saskatchewan Presidents SSHRC Research Grant
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA DISCURSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE MEANING OF HOPE FOR OLDER PALLIATIVE CANCER PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuggleby, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurdock, Natashaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsWendy Duggleby, DSN, RN, AOCN, College of Nursing, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; Natasha Murdock, BSN, RN, Masters in Nursing Student; Karen Wright, PhD RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165516-
dc.description.abstractHealth care professionals who define hope as cure often view the hope of terminally ill patients as a form of denial or false reality. These views have been found to decrease palliative patients’ quality of life (Hall, 1990). Therefore, oncology nurses who understand the meaning of hope for older palliative cancer patients can contribute to their quality of life. A secondary analysis of data from a qualitative study exploring the experience of hope in older palliative cancer patients was conducted to understand the meaning of hope within the culture of the dying cancer patient while accommodating the historical context. The specific aim was to describe the meaning of hope for palliative home care patients with cancer within their social context. The philosophical frame for this study was Potter and Wetherell's (1987) discourse theory, which explores the meaning of concepts using function, construction and variation. The few reported studies focusing on hope in palliative patients have not explored the meaning of hope within the social context of someone who is dying. Saturation was reached with 10 palliative patients with advanced cancer (mean age 75 yrs) who were interviewed in their homes using open-ended questions. Six of the participants were able to complete a second interview where they reviewed their transcripts for accuracy and added additional information if they wanted. Data were analyzed line-by-line examining how hope was used as function; it's construction in dialogue, and how it varied depending upon the social context in which dialogue occurred. As themes emerged memos were kept regarding the social context in which the meaning of hope was described. Throughout the analysis, the research assistant and PI selectively analyzed data separately and then would meet to compare the analysis. Six themes emerged: hope as trust, duty, belief, control, value and worth, and emotion. Variation was encountered in the different stories that each participant described related to social context and function of the word. The results of this study provide a foundation for future research on hope and hope fostering strategies that can be used by oncology nurses to foster hope in older palliative cancer patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:03Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: The University of Saskatchewan Presidents SSHRC Research Grant-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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