Management of Chronic Access of Ommaya Reservoir for Patients With Central Nervous System Disease: The Nurse Practitioner's and Physician Assistant's Role

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165524
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Management of Chronic Access of Ommaya Reservoir for Patients With Central Nervous System Disease: The Nurse Practitioner's and Physician Assistant's Role
Author(s):
Min, Sur
Author Details:
Sur Min, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
The Ommaya reservoir has provided a significant improvement in accessing the central nervous system. It offers a safe, painless alternative to lumbar puncture in managing treatment of patients with leptomengeal carcinomatosis. Accessing the Ommaya reservoir is a new procedure and treatment modality is a new role for the advanced practice oncology nurse (APN) and physician assistant (PA). One study reported complications associated with use of an Ommaya system, including device malfunction and infection related to contamination during the procedure: 2% of the reservoirs were malpositioned, 5% had catheter obstruction, and 2% of the patients developed delayed pressure necrosis. After intra-cerebrospinal fluid drug therapy, 51% of the patients developed meningitis (43% of the patients with drug-induced chemical meningitis and 7.5% of the patients developed bacterial meningitis). This study showed that because use of the Ommaya reservoir system is complicated, aseptic technique is imperative for preventing infection. We conducted an informal study of Ommaya tap procedures by reviewing medical records for symptoms and laboratory data for infection from December 1999 through July 2001. The total number of procedures was 225 (range, 2-44 per patient), and the total number of patients was 13. Common symptoms after the Ommaya procedures were infection (11.25%), headache (6.75%), dizziness (2.25%), nausea/vomiting (9%), bleeding (4.5%), CSF leaking (2.5%), and stiff neck (2.5%). These results demonstrated that the most common complications after procedure are infection, bleeding, headache, and nausea and vomiting which are preventable. These results demonstrated that there is a need to improve our Ommaya reservoir protocol. Development of a protocol accessing the Ommaya reservoir with attention to sterile technique is essential for the advance oncology nurse practitioner and physician assistant. There are no practical procedures in the literature. Therefore, there is a need for a standardized protocol for Ommaya reservoir access. The Ommaya reservoir access standardized protocol will enhance practice for advanced oncology nurse practitioners and physician assistants by preventing complications.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManagement of Chronic Access of Ommaya Reservoir for Patients With Central Nervous System Disease: The Nurse Practitioner's and Physician Assistant's Roleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMin, Suren_US
dc.author.detailsSur Min, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165524-
dc.description.abstractThe Ommaya reservoir has provided a significant improvement in accessing the central nervous system. It offers a safe, painless alternative to lumbar puncture in managing treatment of patients with leptomengeal carcinomatosis. Accessing the Ommaya reservoir is a new procedure and treatment modality is a new role for the advanced practice oncology nurse (APN) and physician assistant (PA). One study reported complications associated with use of an Ommaya system, including device malfunction and infection related to contamination during the procedure: 2% of the reservoirs were malpositioned, 5% had catheter obstruction, and 2% of the patients developed delayed pressure necrosis. After intra-cerebrospinal fluid drug therapy, 51% of the patients developed meningitis (43% of the patients with drug-induced chemical meningitis and 7.5% of the patients developed bacterial meningitis). This study showed that because use of the Ommaya reservoir system is complicated, aseptic technique is imperative for preventing infection. We conducted an informal study of Ommaya tap procedures by reviewing medical records for symptoms and laboratory data for infection from December 1999 through July 2001. The total number of procedures was 225 (range, 2-44 per patient), and the total number of patients was 13. Common symptoms after the Ommaya procedures were infection (11.25%), headache (6.75%), dizziness (2.25%), nausea/vomiting (9%), bleeding (4.5%), CSF leaking (2.5%), and stiff neck (2.5%). These results demonstrated that the most common complications after procedure are infection, bleeding, headache, and nausea and vomiting which are preventable. These results demonstrated that there is a need to improve our Ommaya reservoir protocol. Development of a protocol accessing the Ommaya reservoir with attention to sterile technique is essential for the advance oncology nurse practitioner and physician assistant. There are no practical procedures in the literature. Therefore, there is a need for a standardized protocol for Ommaya reservoir access. The Ommaya reservoir access standardized protocol will enhance practice for advanced oncology nurse practitioners and physician assistants by preventing complications.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:12Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.