Implementation of an Inpatient Nurse Consultant Role and an Outpatient Nurse Coordinator Role for a Center for Palliative Care in an Academic Institution

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165526
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of an Inpatient Nurse Consultant Role and an Outpatient Nurse Coordinator Role for a Center for Palliative Care in an Academic Institution
Author(s):
DeGennaro, Regina
Author Details:
Regina DeGennaro, University of Virginia Health System, Medical Center-Cancer Center Clinic, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: rmd3e@virginia.edu
Abstract:
The Center for Palliative Care at the University of Virginia Health System seeks to provide comprehensive, compassionate care for patients at end of life, while maintaining active research, education, and outreach programs. Five components include: Partnership with a community hospice program which provides continuity of care; establishment of a dedicated unit for end-of-life care which provides better end-of-life care while saving money; maintenance of an open unit (healthcare team follows patients when admitted to palliative care unit), which is essential for improving end-of-life care throughout the hospital and preserving bonds developed between physicians and patients; establishment of a consultant service which is needed to expand the service provided on the PCU and to handle overflow of patients seeking admission to the unit; and establishment of an ambulatory clinic which is needed to provide follow-up care, regular consultation, symptom management, and referral for patients served by Health System physician colleagues and community. The palliative care inpatient nurse consultant works with the primary team to ensure that patients receive excellent management of symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting, dyspnea, and anxiety. The palliative care team is also committed to providing emotional and spiritual support for patients and caregivers, and will work with the primary team to help clarify goals and options for care at the end of life. The outpatient nurse coordinator is in an oncology/palliative care nurse liaison role, which provides comprehensive clinical care management through support of cancer center clinicians and Health System clinics. The palliative care nursing roles are the primary referral resources for the team and function autonomously within the team structure providing expert clinical assessment and seasoned critical thinking skills while serving as patient and family advocates. While the role is still in development, it is hoped that the palliative care nursing specialist role will represent a successful blend of acute, consultative care management and collaborative practice. Goals include support for management of pain and other symptoms and the provision of psychosocial, emotional, and spiritual support for patients and families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of an Inpatient Nurse Consultant Role and an Outpatient Nurse Coordinator Role for a Center for Palliative Care in an Academic Institutionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeGennaro, Reginaen_US
dc.author.detailsRegina DeGennaro, University of Virginia Health System, Medical Center-Cancer Center Clinic, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: rmd3e@virginia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165526-
dc.description.abstractThe Center for Palliative Care at the University of Virginia Health System seeks to provide comprehensive, compassionate care for patients at end of life, while maintaining active research, education, and outreach programs. Five components include: Partnership with a community hospice program which provides continuity of care; establishment of a dedicated unit for end-of-life care which provides better end-of-life care while saving money; maintenance of an open unit (healthcare team follows patients when admitted to palliative care unit), which is essential for improving end-of-life care throughout the hospital and preserving bonds developed between physicians and patients; establishment of a consultant service which is needed to expand the service provided on the PCU and to handle overflow of patients seeking admission to the unit; and establishment of an ambulatory clinic which is needed to provide follow-up care, regular consultation, symptom management, and referral for patients served by Health System physician colleagues and community. The palliative care inpatient nurse consultant works with the primary team to ensure that patients receive excellent management of symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting, dyspnea, and anxiety. The palliative care team is also committed to providing emotional and spiritual support for patients and caregivers, and will work with the primary team to help clarify goals and options for care at the end of life. The outpatient nurse coordinator is in an oncology/palliative care nurse liaison role, which provides comprehensive clinical care management through support of cancer center clinicians and Health System clinics. The palliative care nursing roles are the primary referral resources for the team and function autonomously within the team structure providing expert clinical assessment and seasoned critical thinking skills while serving as patient and family advocates. While the role is still in development, it is hoped that the palliative care nursing specialist role will represent a successful blend of acute, consultative care management and collaborative practice. Goals include support for management of pain and other symptoms and the provision of psychosocial, emotional, and spiritual support for patients and families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:14Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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