2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165530
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Statewide Project to Improve Pain Management in Long-Term Care Facilities
Author(s):
Spivak, Frances
Author Details:
Frances Spivak, Delaware Cancer Pain Initiative, Newark, Delaware, USA
Abstract:
This presentation reports one state cancer pain initiative's experience with implementing the American Alliance of Cancer Pain Initiative's project to improve pain management in long-term care facilities. Most residents in these facilities are older persons who are at particular risk of having undiagnosed or inadequately treated pain. Nursing education alone may be ineffective in addressing this problem if overriding institutional barriers are ignored. The validated multifocal approach used in this 12-month project included the following: Workshops for administrators and staff (at months five and nine); support in the form of consultation and guidance; and provision of tools for assessing and recording pain, establishing policies and protocols, and monitoring quality of pain management through clinical audits (before the first workshop and after the second). A letter of introduction to the project, along with a statement of confidentiality and a contract to be signed by the director of nursing and administrator, was mailed to all 50 licensed skilled nursing facilities in the state. Of the 50 facilities, 16 returned the signed contract pledging to select a team of staff to attend two separate full-day workshops on pain management and to provide the team with administrative support to implement state-of-the-art pain management practices. Before the first workshop, the project site visitor met with the staff in each facility to further explain the project, complete a facility assessment form, and demonstrate the use of a five-part (resident data, admission assessment, most recent assessment, intervention, and documentation) chart audit. Each team was asked to complete 10 randomly selected chart audits. Ten facilities had more than 100 beds, 14 had a hospice contract, six were JCAHO accredited, and four had onsite pharmacies. Analysis of facility assessments and chart audits revealed numerous areas for improvement, which were readily apparent to the facility pain teams. During Workshop 2, facility presentations of their plans revealed great progress in pain management programs and willingness to share successes and problems. Results of this project indicate that education is a vital but not sufficient intervention for improving pain management. With institutional support, nurses are empowered to lead pain management teams effectively.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Statewide Project to Improve Pain Management in Long-Term Care Facilitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSpivak, Francesen_US
dc.author.detailsFrances Spivak, Delaware Cancer Pain Initiative, Newark, Delaware, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165530-
dc.description.abstractThis presentation reports one state cancer pain initiative's experience with implementing the American Alliance of Cancer Pain Initiative's project to improve pain management in long-term care facilities. Most residents in these facilities are older persons who are at particular risk of having undiagnosed or inadequately treated pain. Nursing education alone may be ineffective in addressing this problem if overriding institutional barriers are ignored. The validated multifocal approach used in this 12-month project included the following: Workshops for administrators and staff (at months five and nine); support in the form of consultation and guidance; and provision of tools for assessing and recording pain, establishing policies and protocols, and monitoring quality of pain management through clinical audits (before the first workshop and after the second). A letter of introduction to the project, along with a statement of confidentiality and a contract to be signed by the director of nursing and administrator, was mailed to all 50 licensed skilled nursing facilities in the state. Of the 50 facilities, 16 returned the signed contract pledging to select a team of staff to attend two separate full-day workshops on pain management and to provide the team with administrative support to implement state-of-the-art pain management practices. Before the first workshop, the project site visitor met with the staff in each facility to further explain the project, complete a facility assessment form, and demonstrate the use of a five-part (resident data, admission assessment, most recent assessment, intervention, and documentation) chart audit. Each team was asked to complete 10 randomly selected chart audits. Ten facilities had more than 100 beds, 14 had a hospice contract, six were JCAHO accredited, and four had onsite pharmacies. Analysis of facility assessments and chart audits revealed numerous areas for improvement, which were readily apparent to the facility pain teams. During Workshop 2, facility presentations of their plans revealed great progress in pain management programs and willingness to share successes and problems. Results of this project indicate that education is a vital but not sufficient intervention for improving pain management. With institutional support, nurses are empowered to lead pain management teams effectively.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:18Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.