Neutropenic Fever: Decreasing Cycle Time From Patient Arrival to Initiation of Antibiotic Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165531
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neutropenic Fever: Decreasing Cycle Time From Patient Arrival to Initiation of Antibiotic Therapy
Author(s):
Baltic, Tammy
Author Details:
Tammy Baltic, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA
Abstract:
Neutropenic fever is an oncologic emergency requiring prompt assessment and treatment including administration of antibiotics. Although prompt is not defined, the sooner antibiotics are started, the better the clinical outcome. Our oncology team was concerned about the length of time before adult febrile neutropenic inpatients received their initial dose of antibiotics (cycle time). A retrospective chart review of cycle times for febrile neutropenia patients (FNP) ranged from, 70 to 254 minutes, depending on location of entry into the system (e.g. emergency department, clinic, inpatient unit). The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project was to reduce FNP treatment delays. A multidisciplinary team flow-charted the existing admission process and identified three areas for improvement: The inpatient orders, the admission communication process, and multidisciplinary staff accountability. Staff were inserviced in all newly developed tools to accomplish these improvements which included a staff communication and accountability algorithm (with a standard of a 60-minute cycle time from admission to initiation of antibiotics), preprinted standardized orders, and an antibiotic order form with a bright orange STAT sticker. To further simplify the process, all documents were pre-assembled as a "Febrile Neutropenic Order Packet" and stocked on the inpatient unit. Following implementation, the hematology/oncology clinical nurse specialist (CNS) completed a case review of all FNP which revealed a nearly 50% reduction in cycle time on the inpatient unit. This presentation will describe the QI process, tools, results, and lessons learned.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeutropenic Fever: Decreasing Cycle Time From Patient Arrival to Initiation of Antibiotic Therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaltic, Tammyen_US
dc.author.detailsTammy Baltic, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165531-
dc.description.abstractNeutropenic fever is an oncologic emergency requiring prompt assessment and treatment including administration of antibiotics. Although prompt is not defined, the sooner antibiotics are started, the better the clinical outcome. Our oncology team was concerned about the length of time before adult febrile neutropenic inpatients received their initial dose of antibiotics (cycle time). A retrospective chart review of cycle times for febrile neutropenia patients (FNP) ranged from, 70 to 254 minutes, depending on location of entry into the system (e.g. emergency department, clinic, inpatient unit). The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project was to reduce FNP treatment delays. A multidisciplinary team flow-charted the existing admission process and identified three areas for improvement: The inpatient orders, the admission communication process, and multidisciplinary staff accountability. Staff were inserviced in all newly developed tools to accomplish these improvements which included a staff communication and accountability algorithm (with a standard of a 60-minute cycle time from admission to initiation of antibiotics), preprinted standardized orders, and an antibiotic order form with a bright orange STAT sticker. To further simplify the process, all documents were pre-assembled as a "Febrile Neutropenic Order Packet" and stocked on the inpatient unit. Following implementation, the hematology/oncology clinical nurse specialist (CNS) completed a case review of all FNP which revealed a nearly 50% reduction in cycle time on the inpatient unit. This presentation will describe the QI process, tools, results, and lessons learned.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:20Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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