2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165534
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Best Revenge: Nurses Armed With Data
Author(s):
Siegel, Ellen
Author Details:
Ellen Siegel, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
When we in the QI department observed that few nurses were involved in unit specific process-improvement projects, we joined with the nursing quality council to address this issue. The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Division of Nursing has a shared governance structure consisting of five unique councils. Each council is responsible for an aspect of patient-care delivery. The nursing quality council was charged with providing direction and increasing staff-nurse involvement in quality-improvement (QI) initiatives. The purpose of this project was to use data available to our institution to actively involve staff nurses in performance-improvement initiatives. The council developed a nursing quality plan that was aligned with the institution's strategic vision. The plan had the input and approval of staff nurses and nursing leadership. The membership of the nursing quality council was increased to assure representation from each inpatient and outpatient care area. Then the nursing quality council members were given training in QI skills; data collection (analysis and utilization); plan-do-check-act (performance improvement processes and techniques); and computer skills. The QI Department provided unit-specific results from an institutional patient satisfaction survey to each member. Each member presented the data to his or her unit and facilitated the efforts to improve. Monthly meetings provided a forum for practicing all skills, sharing successes, and learning from others. This methodology assured that the program focused on the specific concerns of oncology patients. In addition, the approaches could be customized to individual care areas. Our patient satisfaction survey scores showed unit specific improvement increased from 82 to 84 in patient's overall satisfaction with teamwork; total processes increased from 80 to 83, and with discharge time increased from 73.5 to 77. This effort also led to the development of an institutional collaborative project to improve pain control for all patients. The nursing quality council members have demonstrated enthusiasm and the ability to utilize data and QI skills and have facilitated outstanding unit-specific process improvement projects. Empowering staff nurses to utilize data for decisions that affect their patients' care has improved the effect of the nursing shared governance structure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Best Revenge: Nurses Armed With Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSiegel, Ellenen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Siegel, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165534-
dc.description.abstractWhen we in the QI department observed that few nurses were involved in unit specific process-improvement projects, we joined with the nursing quality council to address this issue. The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Division of Nursing has a shared governance structure consisting of five unique councils. Each council is responsible for an aspect of patient-care delivery. The nursing quality council was charged with providing direction and increasing staff-nurse involvement in quality-improvement (QI) initiatives. The purpose of this project was to use data available to our institution to actively involve staff nurses in performance-improvement initiatives. The council developed a nursing quality plan that was aligned with the institution's strategic vision. The plan had the input and approval of staff nurses and nursing leadership. The membership of the nursing quality council was increased to assure representation from each inpatient and outpatient care area. Then the nursing quality council members were given training in QI skills; data collection (analysis and utilization); plan-do-check-act (performance improvement processes and techniques); and computer skills. The QI Department provided unit-specific results from an institutional patient satisfaction survey to each member. Each member presented the data to his or her unit and facilitated the efforts to improve. Monthly meetings provided a forum for practicing all skills, sharing successes, and learning from others. This methodology assured that the program focused on the specific concerns of oncology patients. In addition, the approaches could be customized to individual care areas. Our patient satisfaction survey scores showed unit specific improvement increased from 82 to 84 in patient's overall satisfaction with teamwork; total processes increased from 80 to 83, and with discharge time increased from 73.5 to 77. This effort also led to the development of an institutional collaborative project to improve pain control for all patients. The nursing quality council members have demonstrated enthusiasm and the ability to utilize data and QI skills and have facilitated outstanding unit-specific process improvement projects. Empowering staff nurses to utilize data for decisions that affect their patients' care has improved the effect of the nursing shared governance structure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:24Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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