2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165535
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Informatics: Effective Project Management in a Perioperative Setting
Author(s):
Land, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon Land, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
The number of patients receiving surgery at M.D. Anderson has grown dramatically over the past several years, increasing 26% from 1995 to 2000, and the procedures have become more complicated. This necessitates that oncology perioperative teams have access to the surgery schedule, which is constantly being updated, and access to the patient tracking system to follow the patient during their continuum of care. In 1995 a DOS-based system for patient and financial information was put in place. This system was limited in what data could be stored and how it could be reported. A commitment to supplying real-time service-specific information led to the selection and rollout of a Windows-based system using relational database technology. Functional requirements included storage of intraoperative data, ability to schedule complex procedures, and entry of surgical charges for patient billing. Enhanced data collection, generation of standard reports, and the ability of nurses to administer the system were also key selection criteria. Assembling a team that included clinical and information systems personnel working together to ensure a clinical focus was key to the project's success. The team began by developing the system's infrastructure to allow for multi-step implementation. Strategic decision making by upper management during the project allowed the project scope to be controlled and rollout to occur within the desired time frame. The staff was trained on new modified workflow processes. The system was implemented in approximately nine months. Implementation of new information systems can be a difficult task. In order to minimize roadblocks and delays, the following key success factors must be in place: Key decision makers, with the authority to direct and facilitate change, must be identified at the project's inception; a clear vision and direct focus must be developed to assist in guiding the project team; clinical team driven coupled with information systems staff consultation and expertise. Utilization of this type of team approach can be beneficial to any clinical area when introducing new processes to the work setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformatics: Effective Project Management in a Perioperative Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLand, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon Land, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165535-
dc.description.abstractThe number of patients receiving surgery at M.D. Anderson has grown dramatically over the past several years, increasing 26% from 1995 to 2000, and the procedures have become more complicated. This necessitates that oncology perioperative teams have access to the surgery schedule, which is constantly being updated, and access to the patient tracking system to follow the patient during their continuum of care. In 1995 a DOS-based system for patient and financial information was put in place. This system was limited in what data could be stored and how it could be reported. A commitment to supplying real-time service-specific information led to the selection and rollout of a Windows-based system using relational database technology. Functional requirements included storage of intraoperative data, ability to schedule complex procedures, and entry of surgical charges for patient billing. Enhanced data collection, generation of standard reports, and the ability of nurses to administer the system were also key selection criteria. Assembling a team that included clinical and information systems personnel working together to ensure a clinical focus was key to the project's success. The team began by developing the system's infrastructure to allow for multi-step implementation. Strategic decision making by upper management during the project allowed the project scope to be controlled and rollout to occur within the desired time frame. The staff was trained on new modified workflow processes. The system was implemented in approximately nine months. Implementation of new information systems can be a difficult task. In order to minimize roadblocks and delays, the following key success factors must be in place: Key decision makers, with the authority to direct and facilitate change, must be identified at the project's inception; a clear vision and direct focus must be developed to assist in guiding the project team; clinical team driven coupled with information systems staff consultation and expertise. Utilization of this type of team approach can be beneficial to any clinical area when introducing new processes to the work setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:25Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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