2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165536
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Working Together on "The Wait"
Author(s):
Grannan, Maureen
Author Details:
Maureen Grannan, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Background: Multiple factors led to rapid volume growth in our ambulatory cancer setting resulting in increased demand for service, increasing complexity of therapies, changes in delivery patterns, the movement of therapies to the ambulatory arena, and an increase in outpatient symptom management. Patient preference and institution culture resulted in the compression of the majority of patient appointments between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. (10-2). Consistently long wait times resulted in concerns about patient safety and patient/provider satisfaction. The entire institute was challenged to develop a systematic approach to analyze and improve scheduling compression. The clinical service partnered with the Patient and Family Advisory Council, volunteer services, information services, pharmacy, and the quality improvement department to design an interdisciplinary approach to address this issue. Intervention: An analysis of scheduling practices demonstrated that appointments were clustered by day and week in the 10-2 time frame. Provider schedules were redesigned to improve appointment distribution throughout the day and week. Major educational initiatives were employed with providers and schedulers to launch the project and introduce new scheduling guidelines. Cultural changes were addressed through the Patient and Family Advisory Council publication of Q & A handouts for patients describing the need for improved scheduling and the patient's role in the process. Lead articles concerning this initiative were published in the internal newspaper. Posters were also used to educate and promote the project. Comprehensive data collections were completed by the PFAC at the start of the project. Information services worked with the clinical staff developing reports that displayed volume distributions. These reports assist in monitoring progress and identifying needed additional improvements. Discussion: Bringing together numerous individuals from various disciplines in addition to patient representatives, to address the 10-2 issue has been a labor intensive, yet rewarding process. The partnership between the Patient and Family Advisory Council and the clinical providers was a unique format for problem resolution. Also, the integration of information services into this project provided the tools to identify problem areas and to monitor the progress of implemented change. Oncology nurses in other ambulatory oncology programs could benefit from similar collaborative efforts to address patient care service issues.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorking Together on "The Wait"en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrannan, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Grannan, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165536-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Multiple factors led to rapid volume growth in our ambulatory cancer setting resulting in increased demand for service, increasing complexity of therapies, changes in delivery patterns, the movement of therapies to the ambulatory arena, and an increase in outpatient symptom management. Patient preference and institution culture resulted in the compression of the majority of patient appointments between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. (10-2). Consistently long wait times resulted in concerns about patient safety and patient/provider satisfaction. The entire institute was challenged to develop a systematic approach to analyze and improve scheduling compression. The clinical service partnered with the Patient and Family Advisory Council, volunteer services, information services, pharmacy, and the quality improvement department to design an interdisciplinary approach to address this issue. Intervention: An analysis of scheduling practices demonstrated that appointments were clustered by day and week in the 10-2 time frame. Provider schedules were redesigned to improve appointment distribution throughout the day and week. Major educational initiatives were employed with providers and schedulers to launch the project and introduce new scheduling guidelines. Cultural changes were addressed through the Patient and Family Advisory Council publication of Q & A handouts for patients describing the need for improved scheduling and the patient's role in the process. Lead articles concerning this initiative were published in the internal newspaper. Posters were also used to educate and promote the project. Comprehensive data collections were completed by the PFAC at the start of the project. Information services worked with the clinical staff developing reports that displayed volume distributions. These reports assist in monitoring progress and identifying needed additional improvements. Discussion: Bringing together numerous individuals from various disciplines in addition to patient representatives, to address the 10-2 issue has been a labor intensive, yet rewarding process. The partnership between the Patient and Family Advisory Council and the clinical providers was a unique format for problem resolution. Also, the integration of information services into this project provided the tools to identify problem areas and to monitor the progress of implemented change. Oncology nurses in other ambulatory oncology programs could benefit from similar collaborative efforts to address patient care service issues.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:26Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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