2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165540
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Targeted Treatment: Radioimmunotherapy
Author(s):
Ramella, Denise
Author Details:
Denise Ramella, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA
Abstract:
From breast cancer to lymphoma, radioimmunotherapy is being investigated as a treatment for a variety of cancers. The combination of specially designed monoclonal antibodies and radioisotopes have produced a carrier for the toxic substance that allows it to be delivered directly to the site of the tumor. This unique radiation delivery method shows promise in the treatment of metastatic disease not visible by diagnostic means. Some experts believe this targeting of cancer cells for radiotherapy will improve the efficacy and diminish the toxicity of traditional therapy. At present, the isotopes most commonly being used in this fashion are Yttrium (90Y) and Iodine (131I). Both agents are involved in a number of clinical trials to determine their place in the spectrum of cancer treatment. At present, at least two pharmaceutical companies have applied for FDA approval of their radioimmunotherapy products. The purpose of this project is to describe radioimmunotherapy and its implications for nursing care of the oncology patient. While many oncology nurses are familiar with the care of the patient receiving 131I for thyroid ablation, and treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming more commonplace, the combination of the two dictates the nurse be comfortable with both radiation safety practices and symptom management. The key principles of radiation protection (time, distance, and shielding) apply when caring for patients receiving these agents. It is important to keep in mind that radioisotopes differ in terms of half-life and radiation emitted. That factor plays an important role in determining specific safety practices required. A Radiation Safety Officer or staff from the Nuclear Medicine Department, are valuable resources when caring for patients receiving radioisotopes. Side effects most commonly associated with radioimmunotherapy are mainly related to bone marrow toxicity. Other patient reactions may include nausea, chills, fever and throat irritation. Additionally, patients may feel isolated by radiation safety measures. Remaining current with the ever changing face of cancer treatment is a challenge for all oncology nurses. Radioimmunotherapy or targeted treatment of cancer cells, while investigational at this point, will likely be a contributor to the spectrum of cancer care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTargeted Treatment: Radioimmunotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRamella, Deniseen_US
dc.author.detailsDenise Ramella, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165540-
dc.description.abstractFrom breast cancer to lymphoma, radioimmunotherapy is being investigated as a treatment for a variety of cancers. The combination of specially designed monoclonal antibodies and radioisotopes have produced a carrier for the toxic substance that allows it to be delivered directly to the site of the tumor. This unique radiation delivery method shows promise in the treatment of metastatic disease not visible by diagnostic means. Some experts believe this targeting of cancer cells for radiotherapy will improve the efficacy and diminish the toxicity of traditional therapy. At present, the isotopes most commonly being used in this fashion are Yttrium (90Y) and Iodine (131I). Both agents are involved in a number of clinical trials to determine their place in the spectrum of cancer treatment. At present, at least two pharmaceutical companies have applied for FDA approval of their radioimmunotherapy products. The purpose of this project is to describe radioimmunotherapy and its implications for nursing care of the oncology patient. While many oncology nurses are familiar with the care of the patient receiving 131I for thyroid ablation, and treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming more commonplace, the combination of the two dictates the nurse be comfortable with both radiation safety practices and symptom management. The key principles of radiation protection (time, distance, and shielding) apply when caring for patients receiving these agents. It is important to keep in mind that radioisotopes differ in terms of half-life and radiation emitted. That factor plays an important role in determining specific safety practices required. A Radiation Safety Officer or staff from the Nuclear Medicine Department, are valuable resources when caring for patients receiving radioisotopes. Side effects most commonly associated with radioimmunotherapy are mainly related to bone marrow toxicity. Other patient reactions may include nausea, chills, fever and throat irritation. Additionally, patients may feel isolated by radiation safety measures. Remaining current with the ever changing face of cancer treatment is a challenge for all oncology nurses. Radioimmunotherapy or targeted treatment of cancer cells, while investigational at this point, will likely be a contributor to the spectrum of cancer care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:30Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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