Phase I/II: Intravesical Gemcitabine for Superficial Bladder Cancer and Its Nursing Implications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165541
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Phase I/II: Intravesical Gemcitabine for Superficial Bladder Cancer and Its Nursing Implications
Author(s):
DePalma, Dominique
Author Details:
Dominique DePalma, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
American Cancer Society (2001) predicts that there will be 54,300 new cases of bladder cancer diagnosed this year. Studies indicate that superficial bladder cancer accounts for 70% of those cases newly diagnosed. The standard treatment after a resection for high-grade superficial bladder cancer is intravesical agents. Currently, Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) has been the most effective agent to treat and prevent recurrences. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, a phase I/II study is being conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravesical Gemcitabine for patients with superficial bladder cancer. Eligible candidates must have a history of superficial transitional cell carcinoma refractory to BCG for which a cystectomy is recommended. Twelve instillations are administered on a biweekly basis. A transurethral bladder biopsy and cytology are done at the completion of treatment to evaluate response. In phase I, 18 patients were treated with the most common toxicities being frequency and hematuria. The role of the ambulatory nurse is critical in caring for patients receiving intravesical agents prior to, during, and post treatment. Prior to administration of intravesical agents, the nurse obtains a baseline history to adequately manage and gauge toxicities that may occur during treatment. Patient education is paramount in this patient population. The nurse will educate the patient prior to initiation of treatment on the protocol regime and preparation, reporting side effects, safety precautions, and proper disposal of intravesical agents. Prior to each treatment, the nurse performs and documents a thorough toxicity assessment, reports abnormalities to the physician, and delays treatment when appropriate. Nurses perform aseptic and atraumatic catheterizations to minimize infection and systemic absorption. Post treatment, the ambulatory nurse educates the patient about the significance of follow-up to help detect recurrence and progression of disease. The purpose of this presentation is to inform oncology nurses on the use of Gemcitabine, a new investigational intravesical agent and the significant role the nurse plays in agent administration and patient education.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhase I/II: Intravesical Gemcitabine for Superficial Bladder Cancer and Its Nursing Implicationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDePalma, Dominiqueen_US
dc.author.detailsDominique DePalma, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165541-
dc.description.abstractAmerican Cancer Society (2001) predicts that there will be 54,300 new cases of bladder cancer diagnosed this year. Studies indicate that superficial bladder cancer accounts for 70% of those cases newly diagnosed. The standard treatment after a resection for high-grade superficial bladder cancer is intravesical agents. Currently, Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) has been the most effective agent to treat and prevent recurrences. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, a phase I/II study is being conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravesical Gemcitabine for patients with superficial bladder cancer. Eligible candidates must have a history of superficial transitional cell carcinoma refractory to BCG for which a cystectomy is recommended. Twelve instillations are administered on a biweekly basis. A transurethral bladder biopsy and cytology are done at the completion of treatment to evaluate response. In phase I, 18 patients were treated with the most common toxicities being frequency and hematuria. The role of the ambulatory nurse is critical in caring for patients receiving intravesical agents prior to, during, and post treatment. Prior to administration of intravesical agents, the nurse obtains a baseline history to adequately manage and gauge toxicities that may occur during treatment. Patient education is paramount in this patient population. The nurse will educate the patient prior to initiation of treatment on the protocol regime and preparation, reporting side effects, safety precautions, and proper disposal of intravesical agents. Prior to each treatment, the nurse performs and documents a thorough toxicity assessment, reports abnormalities to the physician, and delays treatment when appropriate. Nurses perform aseptic and atraumatic catheterizations to minimize infection and systemic absorption. Post treatment, the ambulatory nurse educates the patient about the significance of follow-up to help detect recurrence and progression of disease. The purpose of this presentation is to inform oncology nurses on the use of Gemcitabine, a new investigational intravesical agent and the significant role the nurse plays in agent administration and patient education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:31Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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