Improving the Quality of Life for Men With Prostate Cancer: Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction Following a Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165544
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving the Quality of Life for Men With Prostate Cancer: Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction Following a Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy
Author(s):
Schoen, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Schoen, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Continued sexual function after a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) is a critical aspect of quality of life that cannot be overemphasized. Most men who have undergone RRP are generally healthy with a long life expectancy and did not have erectile dysfunction (ED) prior to surgery. Patient education is essential. Oncology nurses must be knowledgeable regarding current treatment for ED and refer patients to support groups and ED specialists as needed. A normal erection is a complex neurovascular phenomenon, relying on multiple interacting physiological mechanisms. The nerve-sparing approach to surgery has significantly improved postoperative erectile function. However, it can take from four to 18 months before the patient can again achieve a full erection on his own. There are a variety of methods available to restore erectile potential. Studies show that the most effective and readily accepted methods are oral medications; and if oral medication is unsuccessful, penile self-injections. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, ambulatory care nurses assume responsibility in educating patients about the treatment for ED. Men are encouraged to initiate sexual activity within a few weeks after catheter removal to get blood flowing to the penis. The first-line therapy in the treatment of post RRP ED is Viagra. Taken orally, it relaxes smooth muscles in the small arteries of the penis, increasing blood flow and allowing the return of erections. To ensure that patients are adequately instructed in taking the medication, the nursing staff developed a Viagra fact card which emphasizes side effects, when to take the medication, onset of action, and drug interactions. Viagra does not work for approximately 30% of men. In this case, the patient is referred to an ED specialist who can prescribe penile self-injections, (commonly called Caverject injections). After the medication is injected into the base of the penis, an erection develops. Nursing education focuses on injection technique and side effects. This presentation will provide an overview of ED, the most common treatment options available, discussion of the potential side effects, and the patient education plan developed by oncology nurses in this setting to optimize patient involvement in the treatment decision.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving the Quality of Life for Men With Prostate Cancer: Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction Following a Radical Retropubic Prostatectomyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchoen, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Schoen, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165544-
dc.description.abstractContinued sexual function after a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) is a critical aspect of quality of life that cannot be overemphasized. Most men who have undergone RRP are generally healthy with a long life expectancy and did not have erectile dysfunction (ED) prior to surgery. Patient education is essential. Oncology nurses must be knowledgeable regarding current treatment for ED and refer patients to support groups and ED specialists as needed. A normal erection is a complex neurovascular phenomenon, relying on multiple interacting physiological mechanisms. The nerve-sparing approach to surgery has significantly improved postoperative erectile function. However, it can take from four to 18 months before the patient can again achieve a full erection on his own. There are a variety of methods available to restore erectile potential. Studies show that the most effective and readily accepted methods are oral medications; and if oral medication is unsuccessful, penile self-injections. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, ambulatory care nurses assume responsibility in educating patients about the treatment for ED. Men are encouraged to initiate sexual activity within a few weeks after catheter removal to get blood flowing to the penis. The first-line therapy in the treatment of post RRP ED is Viagra. Taken orally, it relaxes smooth muscles in the small arteries of the penis, increasing blood flow and allowing the return of erections. To ensure that patients are adequately instructed in taking the medication, the nursing staff developed a Viagra fact card which emphasizes side effects, when to take the medication, onset of action, and drug interactions. Viagra does not work for approximately 30% of men. In this case, the patient is referred to an ED specialist who can prescribe penile self-injections, (commonly called Caverject injections). After the medication is injected into the base of the penis, an erection develops. Nursing education focuses on injection technique and side effects. This presentation will provide an overview of ED, the most common treatment options available, discussion of the potential side effects, and the patient education plan developed by oncology nurses in this setting to optimize patient involvement in the treatment decision.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:34Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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