2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165545
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testosterone Replacement for Patients With Testicular Cancer
Author(s):
Sinopoli, Theresa
Author Details:
Theresa Sinopoli, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Testicular cancer is a highly curable disease affecting young men. Disease and treatment effects may impact sexual functioning and fertility and are significant quality-of-life issues. Low testosterone levels may be related to disease process as well as a result of chemotherapy treatment. When testosterone levels are low, patients present with symptoms of fatigue, loss of libido, depression, hot flashes, and weight loss. Evaluation includes assessment of symptoms and the following blood tests: FSH, LH, Estradiol, free and bound testosterone levels. Once a diagnosis of low testosterone is established, patients are started on hormone replacement therapy. In the past, patients were treated with testosterone injections administered deep intramuscularly every two to three weeks. This medication is prepared in an oil base and may be painful, especially for thin patients. An alternative delivery method was a testosterone patch, which caused skin reactions in some patients. Recently, a new testosterone agent that is applied as a gel has been introduced which allows for greater patient independence and comfort. Patient education regarding application and safety precautions are reviewed with patients prior to initiation of therapy. Since this is a topical agent that can be absorbed by anyone coming in contact with the gel within the first hour of application, patients are taught safe handling of the gel, the importance of hand washing, and avoidance of contact with others until the gel is absorbed through the skin. It is especially important that pregnant women and children are protected from contact with the gel, as this medication is harmful to them. Other factors addressed during teaching include reviewing application technique, side effects, drug interactions, and symptoms to report as well as the necessary follow up blood studies to monitor response. At our NCI-designated institution a fact card was developed to address the educational needs of these patients. This presentation will review the low testosterone phenomena, the physiologic side effects patients experience, and the changes that occur in all blood levels when testosterone levels are low. It will also include the monitoring needs and education plan including the fact card developed for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTestosterone Replacement for Patients With Testicular Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSinopoli, Theresaen_US
dc.author.detailsTheresa Sinopoli, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165545-
dc.description.abstractTesticular cancer is a highly curable disease affecting young men. Disease and treatment effects may impact sexual functioning and fertility and are significant quality-of-life issues. Low testosterone levels may be related to disease process as well as a result of chemotherapy treatment. When testosterone levels are low, patients present with symptoms of fatigue, loss of libido, depression, hot flashes, and weight loss. Evaluation includes assessment of symptoms and the following blood tests: FSH, LH, Estradiol, free and bound testosterone levels. Once a diagnosis of low testosterone is established, patients are started on hormone replacement therapy. In the past, patients were treated with testosterone injections administered deep intramuscularly every two to three weeks. This medication is prepared in an oil base and may be painful, especially for thin patients. An alternative delivery method was a testosterone patch, which caused skin reactions in some patients. Recently, a new testosterone agent that is applied as a gel has been introduced which allows for greater patient independence and comfort. Patient education regarding application and safety precautions are reviewed with patients prior to initiation of therapy. Since this is a topical agent that can be absorbed by anyone coming in contact with the gel within the first hour of application, patients are taught safe handling of the gel, the importance of hand washing, and avoidance of contact with others until the gel is absorbed through the skin. It is especially important that pregnant women and children are protected from contact with the gel, as this medication is harmful to them. Other factors addressed during teaching include reviewing application technique, side effects, drug interactions, and symptoms to report as well as the necessary follow up blood studies to monitor response. At our NCI-designated institution a fact card was developed to address the educational needs of these patients. This presentation will review the low testosterone phenomena, the physiologic side effects patients experience, and the changes that occur in all blood levels when testosterone levels are low. It will also include the monitoring needs and education plan including the fact card developed for this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:35Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.