Surgical Decision Making for Cancer Patients With Advanced Malignancies and Their Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165547
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Surgical Decision Making for Cancer Patients With Advanced Malignancies and Their Families
Author(s):
Borneman, Tami
Author Details:
Tami Borneman, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA
Abstract:
Palliative surgery is an important yet understudied aspect of palliative care. Many palliative procedures offer hope of possibly extending the quantity of life in addition to improving the quality of life. However many patients and family members misinterpret the goals and focus on cure and the prolongation of life rather than the relief of symptoms. The purpose of the study was to describe decision making in surgical oncology regarding advanced disease. Key objectives were addressed in the study questions: 1) What quality of life (QOL) concerns/symptoms led to the consideration of palliative surgery as an option of care? 2) What are the perceived risks and benefits of palliative surgery for you? 3) What understanding of other options do you have and how do you decide which one(s) to use? and after surgery, 4) What were the outcomes of having had palliative surgery and how has that impacted your QOL? The City of Hope Quality of Life Model for Cancer and the Clinical Decision-Making in Palliative Surgery Model served as the conceptual framework. The QOL model includes four dimensions of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well being. The decision model includes influencing factors, process, choices, and outcomes. A total of 42 taped interviews were conducted with patients and family caregivers prior to and post surgery for advanced cancer. Data were analyzed using content analysis methods (Krippendorff) to identify major themes of patients and family caregivers based on the study questions. Results revealed several major themes for patients such as "Faith in God," "Symptom Control," "What Choice?", "I'm Cancer Free," and "Trusting the Doctor." Major themes for family caregivers included "Symptom Management," "Fear of Loved One Dying," "Faith in God," "Importance of Percentages," and "Coping at Home." Findings demonstrate that patients and their family caregivers require support in the decision-making process in advanced disease. Difficulties lie in the concerns woven throughout the major themes. Findings support the need for continued communication regarding the goal of palliative surgery as well as the need to address the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual ramifications of advanced disease and palliative surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurgical Decision Making for Cancer Patients With Advanced Malignancies and Their Familiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBorneman, Tamien_US
dc.author.detailsTami Borneman, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165547-
dc.description.abstractPalliative surgery is an important yet understudied aspect of palliative care. Many palliative procedures offer hope of possibly extending the quantity of life in addition to improving the quality of life. However many patients and family members misinterpret the goals and focus on cure and the prolongation of life rather than the relief of symptoms. The purpose of the study was to describe decision making in surgical oncology regarding advanced disease. Key objectives were addressed in the study questions: 1) What quality of life (QOL) concerns/symptoms led to the consideration of palliative surgery as an option of care? 2) What are the perceived risks and benefits of palliative surgery for you? 3) What understanding of other options do you have and how do you decide which one(s) to use? and after surgery, 4) What were the outcomes of having had palliative surgery and how has that impacted your QOL? The City of Hope Quality of Life Model for Cancer and the Clinical Decision-Making in Palliative Surgery Model served as the conceptual framework. The QOL model includes four dimensions of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well being. The decision model includes influencing factors, process, choices, and outcomes. A total of 42 taped interviews were conducted with patients and family caregivers prior to and post surgery for advanced cancer. Data were analyzed using content analysis methods (Krippendorff) to identify major themes of patients and family caregivers based on the study questions. Results revealed several major themes for patients such as "Faith in God," "Symptom Control," "What Choice?", "I'm Cancer Free," and "Trusting the Doctor." Major themes for family caregivers included "Symptom Management," "Fear of Loved One Dying," "Faith in God," "Importance of Percentages," and "Coping at Home." Findings demonstrate that patients and their family caregivers require support in the decision-making process in advanced disease. Difficulties lie in the concerns woven throughout the major themes. Findings support the need for continued communication regarding the goal of palliative surgery as well as the need to address the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual ramifications of advanced disease and palliative surgery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:38Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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